Gorgias


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Gorgias

(gôr`jēəs), c.485–c.380 B.C., Greek Sophist. From his native city, Leontini, Sicily, he was sent as an ambassador to Athens, where he settled to teach and practice rhetoric. Gorgias pursued the negative implications of the Eleatic school and asserted: (1) Nothing exists; (2) If anything does exist, it cannot be known; (3) If it can be known, the knowledge of it cannot be communicated. Objective truth being thus impossible, there remains only the art of the SophistsSophists
, originally, itinerant teachers in Greece (5th cent. B.C.) who provided education through lectures and in return received fees from their audiences. The term was given as a mark of respect.
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, persuasion. Such arguments undermined the foundations of polytheism and led to open challenges of current moral standards. His challenge to speculative thought stimulated a more sophisticated approach to the problems of philosophy. A dialogue of Plato's bears his name.
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References in periodicals archive ?
De acuerdo con esto, las condiciones para el ejercicio de la politica enunciadas en el Gorgias (487a), a saber, conocimiento o ciencia (enioTqpq), buena voluntad (tuvoia) y franqueza (nappnoia), pueden ser leidas como las condiciones que enmarcan, de manera muy general, la verdad del discurso politico (9).
(21) O caso da fisiologia do prazer parece ser um exemplo de tal interesse, pois algumas semelhancas terminologicas e conceituais podem ser identificas entre a concepcao acerca do prazer advindo da nutricao no tratado Sobre doencas IV e a que esta presente em um determinado momento do dialogo Gorgias de Platao.
In order to answer these questions, let us turn first to the Gorgias, where Socrates reaffirms the benefits of being refuted.
"This is a very old philosophical question that was started by Plato in the 'Gorgias Dialogue,' about 2,000 years ago, and already asked if we could consider cuisine a form of art," Perullo said.
By 1966 Isgro had theorized his "visual poetry" as a "general art of the sign" in which "verbal material and iconic material, namely word and image, coexist in an attempt to initiate an organic esthetic manifestation." His was a distinctly European approach, descended from a critical tradition of Western thought--stretching from the philosophy of Gorgias to the literature of Luigi Pirandello--that was founded on paradox.
Realizing this, Plato tells us in Gorgias, Prometheus gave us another, a much greater gift.