Gorky, University of

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gorky, University of

 

(full name, N. I. Lobachevskii University of Gorky). A university founded in Nizhny Novgorod by a decree signed by V. I. Lenin on June 25, 1918. In 1930 it was reorganized into mechanical engineering, chemical technological, civil engineering, agricultural, medical, and pedagogical institutes. In 1931 it was restructured into the departments of physics and mathematics, biology, and chemistry. In 1956 the name of N. I. Lobachevskii was conferred on the university.

The university has (1971) seven departments (mechanics and mathematics, radiophysics, computer mathematics and cybernetics, chemistry, biology, history and philology, and industrial economics), an evening division, a correspondence school, a graduate school, three scientific research institutes (physicotechnical, chemistry, and applied mathematics and cybernetics), 59 subdepartments, three scientific research laboratories, a botanical garden, biological and latitude stations, a zoological museum, and a library (1.1 million volumes). In the 1970–71 academic year, some 10,000 students were enrolled in the university and nearly 1,300 teachers and research workers were working there, including two academicians and one corresponding member of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, 35 professors and doctors of sciences, and 350 docents and candidates of sciences. The activities of many well-known scientists and scholars are connected with the university: the physicists A. A. Andronov and V. L. Ginzburg, the crystallographer N. V. Belov, the chemist G. A. Razuvaev, the geneticist S. S. Chetveri-kov, the historian S. I. Arkhangel’skii, and others. The university publishes the journal Radiofizika (since 1958), Izvestiia vysshikh uchebnych zavedenii (since 1958), and Uchenye zapiski (since 1935). Over the years of its existence the university has trained close to 21,000 specialists.

A. G. UGODCHIKOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.