Gothic architecture


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Gothic architecture

(1050–1530)
A revolutionary style of construction of the High Middle Ages in western Europe which emerged from Romanesque and Byzantine forms. The term “Gothic” was originally applied as one of reproach and contempt. The style was characterized by a delicate balance between the lateral thrust from loads and the force of gravity. It was most often found in cathedrals employing the rib vault, pointed arches, flying buttresses and the gradual reduction of the walls to a system of richly decorated fenestration. The style’s features were height and light, achieved through a mixture of skeletal structures and increasing use of windows. Walls were no longer necessary to support the roof and could be replaced with large, tall windows of stained glass. One of the finest and oldest examples of French Gothic architecture is Notre Dame in Paris.

Gothic architecture

Gothic architecture: vault construction
Gothic architecture: Gothic pier
Gothic architecture: Late type Gothic base, Rouen
Gothic architecture showing construction of a Gothic church, illustrating principles of isolated supports and buttressing
The architectural style of the High Middle Ages in Western Europe, which emerged from Romanesque and Byzantine forms in France during the later 12th cent. Its great works are cathedrals, characterized by the pointed arch, the rib vault, the development of the exterior flying buttress, and the gradual reduction of the walls to a system of richly decorated fenestration. Gothic architecture lasted until the 16th cent., when it was succeeded by the classical forms of the Renaissance. In France and Germany one speaks of the Early, High, and Late Gothic; the French middle phase is referred to as Rayonnant, the late phase as Flamboyant. In English architecture the usual divisions are Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular.
References in periodicals archive ?
Viollet-le-Duc didn't view the Gothic architecture as merely a fashionable design, Murray said, but rather as an indelible part of France's national identity.
This study of gothic architecture in Ireland from 1789 to 1915 concentrates on smaller buildings, such as parish churches, monasteries, and cathedrals outside of Dublin.
In the 19th century Augustus Pugin, the eminent English architect and Catholic convert, made this remarkable claim: Gothic architecture is Christian architecture.
Julien Macdonald cited gothic architecture as the inspiration for his new collection which features a dazzling display of metals, sheer fabrics and even feathers.
DESCRIPTION: Located in popular Midtown Nashville on 10 acres of beautiful grounds complete with historic gothic architecture. Once a college campus, Scarritt-Bennett offers simple, affordable, single dorm-style bedrooms with a shared bath between 2 rooms, warm hospitality, free wifi, complimentary parking, 25 meeting spaces ranging in capacity from 4-250, delicious catering, 2 chapels and outdoor labyrinth.
The castle-like school with its Gothic architecture is long gone, but it's a special spot still.
A kind of design challenge to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time, it was an attempt to recreate the Gothic architecture of the medieval period.
He was also an authority on Gothic architecture and became the archivist and historian of the MacLeod clan.
The book will be of substantial interest to scholars who are interested in the most recent technologies and theories applied to medieval architecture, and more specifically to French and English Gothic architecture, as most texts concern the architecture of the twelfth to the fourteenth century in these two countries.
The house was of real Gothic architecture, built of rude stone with battlements'.
The building reflects Victorian Gothic architecture, the highlight of which is the eight-story glass atrium