Gothick


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Neo-Gothic

The reuse of forms of Gothic architecture in the second half of the 19th century and thereafter.
References in periodicals archive ?
How could they have not been so, mused Morgan, when the two peoples had been in proximity for centuries, so much so that "the present Spanish Nation has not in its Veins abundantly less of Gothick and old Iberian Blood, than of Arabian and Mauritanian.
He had this little Gothick scene photographed, too .
69) Joan Kerr and James Broadbent, Gothick Taste in the Colony of New South Wales, Sydney, 1980, pp.
111-53; Victor Sage, 'Gothic Laughter: Farce and Horror in Five Texts', in Gothick Origins and Innovations, ed.
Among Terry's most felicitous designs are the Ionic, Veneto, Gothick, Corinthian, Tuscan, and Regency Villas in Regent's Park, the details of which have evolved from intense study.
If we reduce to blue -book exactitudes his unique and invigorating compound of the Theophrastan character, Smolletry, Juvenalian satire, the Gothick romance--and many other anti-documentary elements beside--we keep company with Mrs General in bolting 'the driest little bones of antiquity' .
I can speak for the Saxon, Gothick, and Francick, or Old Teutonick: which.
The only remaining vestige of St Stephen's is the crypt of its chapel, tricked out in Pugin gothick.
The title of Joseph Browne's poem immediately evokes several then well-applauded concepts and connections: The Gothick Hero.
We went to see Esher Mr Pelham's,(19) whose House is curious and vastly pretty in its way, being a Gothick Building occasion'd by Cardinal Woolsey's beginning it; and whose Garden & that together is all harmony & tranquiility.
After Purcell's Funeral Music for Queen Mary - itself richly ambiguous since some of the selfsame strains had been used for Don Juan's descent into hell in Shadwell's Libertine - there came, to the accompaniment of a rustic anthem, a tempestuous evocation of the attitudes towards death characteristic of the Gothick movement which was, of course, soon to bequeath to Romanticism its relish'of the macabre.
Reginald Turnor visited it shortly before the end, finding the tower 'really beautiful in silhouette', but concluding that 'The rest of the house is appallingly bad Gothick, pretentious and gimcrack, not to be regretted if it moulders to collapse.