governor

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governor,

chief executive of a dependent or component unit in a political system. In the United States, a governor is the chief executive of each state and is elected by the people of the state. In the British, French, and Dutch empires a governor was traditionally appointed to rule over each of the colonies. Governors in the United States originally lacked much power. They were often subordinate to the state legislatures and had little control over administrative agencies. However, political reforms in the early 20th cent. shifted power from the legislative to the executive branches of state governments, and today governors are among the most powerful political figures in the United States. At the National Governors Conference, developed from a meeting called (1908) by President Theodore Roosevelt, the nation's governors meet annually to discuss common political and governmental problems.

governor,

automatic device used to regulate and control such variables as speed or pressure in the functioning of an engine or other machine. A governor may be an electric, hydraulic, or mechanical device, or it may employ some combination of electric, hydraulic, and mechanical components. The constant-speed governor serves to keep the speed of an engine constant under changes in load and other disturbances. It is very often a mechanical device, employing centrifugal force. Such a governor contains weights, called flyballs, each attached to the end of an arm. The arms are arranged, like the spokes of wheels, around a central spindle and are connected to the inlet valve (commonly called the governor valve). The flyballs are so attached that they move away from the spindle as the speed increases (decreasing the fuel or steam to the inlet) and come closer to the spindle as the speed decreases (increasing the fuel or steam), thereby keeping the speed constant. Varying degrees of closure and the speeds at which they are to occur can be set in advance. Where changes are required while an engine is in operation, a variable-speed governor is employed. A governor-synchronizing device is used to equalize the speed of two or more engines driving electric generators before they engage the generators. In order to control the speed of some engines, a governor's output must be strengthened by connecting the output to a hydraulic amplifier.

Governor

 

(1) In present-day bourgeois states, the highest official in a territorial unit. For example, in the USA a governor is the executive head of a state, popularly elected from among candidates nominated by the leading bourgeois parties. In Denmark each of the 25 districts is headed by a governor appointed by the king. In Great Britain a governor is an official appointed by the British government to administer a colony.

(2) In prerevolutionary Russia, the highest government official in a province, who performed administrative, police, and military functions.

governor

[′gəv·ə·nər]
(mechanical engineering)
A device, especially one actuated by the centrifugal force of whirling weights opposed by gravity or by springs, used to provide automatic control of speed or power of a prime mover.

governor

A type of control to ensure that certain types of equipment, like high-pressure fuel pumps, operate at the desired speed. A governor has a sensor to measure the speed, a datum from which the equipment speed is referenced, and a control to adjust the speed to align it with the datum. See overspeed governor.

governor

1. the ruler or chief magistrate of a colony, province, etc.
2. the representative of the Crown in a British colony
3. Brit the senior administrator or head of a society, prison, etc.
4. the chief executive of any state in the US
5. Engineering a device that controls the speed of an engine, esp by regulating the supply of fuel, etc., either to limit the maximum speed or to maintain a constant speed
References in periodicals archive ?
The generall historie of Virginia, New-England and the Summer Isles: with the names of the adventurers, planters, and governours from their first beginning in 1584 to this present 1624.
People may choose the person of the governor, but they cannot empower him, Astell argued, because "none can give what they have not: The People have no Authority over their own Lives, consequently they can't invest such an Authority in their Governours" (1704, 18).
(47) In Short Treatise, Ponet argues that a kingdom 'may live when the head is cut off, and may put on a new head that is, make them a new Governour, when they see their old head seek too much his own will, and not the wealth of the whole body'.
B2 (b) be] B1, B2 | be <between> B3 (c) it] B1, B2 | [begin strikethrough]it[end strikethrough] B3 (d) as] B1, B2 | <as> B3 (e) Governors] Governour B2 | governor B3 (f) possibly] possible B2, B3 (g) communicative] communicat[begin strikethrough][?][end strikethrough]<ive> B1 | communicative B2 | commut[begin strikethrough][?][end strikethrough]ative B3 (h) distributive] B1, B2 | distributative B3 (i) all] om.
Although Bellona connects the Tower to the Crown as "a Tower / Supported by no lesse than Soveraigne power," she destabilizes royal power and contests the royal ideology, as Londini Sinus Salutis had done, by calling the new mayor, and not the king, "the prime governour" of this "Royall Fort" (C2v).
8 for the friendship of Titus and Gisippus, though the canonical account became Sir Thomas Elyot's The Boke Named the Governour (1531), chapter 12: Gisippus hands over his beloved Sophronia to Titus when he finds that his friend has also fallen in love with her; Titus later rescues Gisippus from false murder charges.
He underwrites these readings with a careful analysis of John Lyly's Euphues, which, he argues, satirizes the friendship ideal extolled by Sir Thomas Elyot in his story of Titus and Gisippus in The Boke Named the Governour. Indeed, in many of his chapters, MacFaul anchors the discussion of Shakespeare to analysis of other major works, such as Book IV of The Faerie Queene, and any number of non-Shakespearean plays.
(150) Similarly, Hamilton proposed vesting "[t]he supreme Executive authority of the United States" in a "Governour" who "serve[d] during good behavior...." (151) Among his other powers, this "Executive" would have "the execution of all laws passed...." (152)
Your Majestie is that princely governour and noble Queene whom we all serve....
I had now nothing to mind, but the place whether I was to go, being very old, almost eighty years, I gave my Cabin and Furniture that was left to my eldest son after my decease, who had married my eldest Daughter by my beloved Wife, whom I made King and Governour of all the rest: I informed them of the Manners of Europe, and charged them to remember the Christian Religion, after the manner of them that spake the same Language, and to admit no other, if hereafter any should come and find them out.
One Massachusetts official reported being "present when an article of the Peace has run in one sense in the English [language] and quite contrarie in the Indian by the Governour's express order." (20) The provisions subjecting the Abenakis to English sovereignty and law (as well as several others unrelated to this argument) were consistently mistranslated to make them more palatable to the Abenakis.