governor

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governor,

chief executive of a dependent or component unit in a political system. In the United States, a governor is the chief executive of each state and is elected by the people of the state. In the British, French, and Dutch empires a governor was traditionally appointed to rule over each of the colonies. Governors in the United States originally lacked much power. They were often subordinate to the state legislatures and had little control over administrative agencies. However, political reforms in the early 20th cent. shifted power from the legislative to the executive branches of state governments, and today governors are among the most powerful political figures in the United States. At the National Governors Conference, developed from a meeting called (1908) by President Theodore Roosevelt, the nation's governors meet annually to discuss common political and governmental problems.

governor,

automatic device used to regulate and control such variables as speed or pressure in the functioning of an engine or other machine. A governor may be an electric, hydraulic, or mechanical device, or it may employ some combination of electric, hydraulic, and mechanical components. The constant-speed governor serves to keep the speed of an engine constant under changes in load and other disturbances. It is very often a mechanical device, employing centrifugal force. Such a governor contains weights, called flyballs, each attached to the end of an arm. The arms are arranged, like the spokes of wheels, around a central spindle and are connected to the inlet valve (commonly called the governor valve). The flyballs are so attached that they move away from the spindle as the speed increases (decreasing the fuel or steam to the inlet) and come closer to the spindle as the speed decreases (increasing the fuel or steam), thereby keeping the speed constant. Varying degrees of closure and the speeds at which they are to occur can be set in advance. Where changes are required while an engine is in operation, a variable-speed governor is employed. A governor-synchronizing device is used to equalize the speed of two or more engines driving electric generators before they engage the generators. In order to control the speed of some engines, a governor's output must be strengthened by connecting the output to a hydraulic amplifier.

Governor

 

(1) In present-day bourgeois states, the highest official in a territorial unit. For example, in the USA a governor is the executive head of a state, popularly elected from among candidates nominated by the leading bourgeois parties. In Denmark each of the 25 districts is headed by a governor appointed by the king. In Great Britain a governor is an official appointed by the British government to administer a colony.

(2) In prerevolutionary Russia, the highest government official in a province, who performed administrative, police, and military functions.

governor

[′gəv·ə·nər]
(mechanical engineering)
A device, especially one actuated by the centrifugal force of whirling weights opposed by gravity or by springs, used to provide automatic control of speed or power of a prime mover.

governor

A type of control to ensure that certain types of equipment, like high-pressure fuel pumps, operate at the desired speed. A governor has a sensor to measure the speed, a datum from which the equipment speed is referenced, and a control to adjust the speed to align it with the datum. See overspeed governor.

governor

1. the ruler or chief magistrate of a colony, province, etc.
2. the representative of the Crown in a British colony
3. Brit the senior administrator or head of a society, prison, etc.
4. the chief executive of any state in the US
5. Engineering a device that controls the speed of an engine, esp by regulating the supply of fuel, etc., either to limit the maximum speed or to maintain a constant speed
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides the influential treatises of Erasmus and Vives, the central texts cited are Roger Ascham's The Scholemaster (1570), Thomas Elyot's Boke Named the Governour (1531) and Richard Mulcaster's Positions Concerning the Training Up of Children (1581).
Some Generals of Armies, and Governours of Cities, Townes, &c.
42) Fellow Presbyterian Thomas Rosewell asserted that Christ's kingdom would not be set up by human power and he named "Insurrection and rising up against the Lords lawfull Governours and Government, whether Civil or Ecclesiastical" as a "pestilential and highly provoking sin.
all born equally, high and low, governours and governed, in subjection to one great, immutable, pre-existent law, prior to all our devices, and prior to all our contrivances, paramount to all our ideas, and all our sensations, antecedent to our very existence, by which we are knit and connected in the eternal frame of the Universe, out of which we cannot stir.
For if nourture be neglected, then our elders and governours shall not bee reverenced: if they bee not reverenced, they will not bee regarded: if they be not regarded, they will not be obeyed: and if they be not obeyed, then steps in rebellion, and everyone will doo what he listeth.
Jegon, complained to Burghley that the town had been "more factious and stirringe now of late then in former tymes, making choise of suche to be governours amongest them, as are most boulde and forward in attemptes against this University.
Delighting in the great authors, he would plunder their works for "sentences teaching good maners," and "having written them out word by word, he gave out a copy of them to his familiars: and sent them about to the governours of provinces, and to the magistrates of ROME and of other cities.
A Shorte Treatise of politicke power, and of the true Obedience which subjectes owe to kynges and other civile Governours.
For example, Richard Bancroft's 1593 Daungerous Positions and Proceedings, Published and Practised within this Island of Brytaine makes reference to seditious books which claim that "The authoritie, which Princes have, is given them from the people: Kings, Princes, and governours, have their authoritie of the people; and (upon occasion) the people may take it away again" (London: J.