graben

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graben

(grah -ben) An elongated depression of land between two faults. Lunar graben are usually 1–2 km wide and may be hundreds of kilometers in length.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Graben

 

a portion of the earth’s crust that is sunken relative to surrounding areas along steep, often vertical fractures, usually faults. The largest system of graben in the world is found in East Africa (Great Rift Valley). In Western Europe the largest graben is the valley of the Rhine River. Grabens on a planetary scale are called rifts. Grabens with additional fractures at their edges, which form a series of steps, are called complex grabens.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

graben

[′grä·bən]
(geology)
A block of the earth's crust, generally with a length much greater than its width, that has dropped relative to the blocks on either side.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* 40 new applications totalling 12,842 hectares effectively doubling Japan Gold's Sanru Project in the Omu-Kamikawa graben, northern Hokkaido;
Generally, these faults strike NW-SE and are extensional normal faults that generally form grabens and half grabens.
Grabens are nothing but small indentations on a planet's crust.
Knowledge of the subsurface structure of this area is very important for groundwater exploration because an important transboundary Plio-Quaternary aquifer occurs in a graben in the study area.
These reservoirs systems are composed of varied architectural elements such as the Horst and Graben geometries.
The horst flanks supplied debris for the rapid infilling of the grabens, preventing pedogenesis there.
Geology of the northern side of the Gulf of Edremit and its tectonic significance for the development of the Aegean grabens. Geodin.
Source rocks for these basins are frequently anoxic shales deposited in restricted lagoonal conditions in Early Tertiary grabens under the back arcs.
- What are the strategies to evacuate and transport the oil produced in Grabens Albertine and Tanganyika?