Graeco-Roman


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Graeco-Roman

(esp US), Greco-Roman
1. of, characteristic of, or relating to Greek and Roman influences, as found in Roman sculpture
2. denoting a style of wrestling in which the legs may not be used to obtain a fall and no hold may be applied below the waist
References in periodicals archive ?
The church, of the Graeco-Roman design, is an elongated rectangular structure with a main nave and two side aisles.
The Graeco-Roman Museum was constructed with the goal of preserving Alexandria's rich history and cultural heritage.
In the section on visual arts, the division of chapters into architecture, sculpture, and painting (mosaics and painting for the Graeco-Roman period) leads to the relative neglect of bas-relief.
In teams' ranking, the women's and men's free wrestling teams finished third while in Graeco-Roman wrestling, Tunisia ranked fourth.
The Graeco-Roman Museum remained an almost untouched Italian fiefdom, but everywhere else the French, British, and Germans were fighting it out for dominance.
IS rules large parts of Iraq and Syria which contain some of the richest archaeological treasures on earth, where ancient Assyrian empires built their capitals, Graeco-Roman civilisation flourished and Muslim and Christian sects co-existed for centuries.
Contributors present interconnected studies of some of the most important moments and figures in the history of the comic genre and its reception from Graeco-Roman times to the present.
The Mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: Cult, Polis, and Change in the Graeco-Roman World, by Guy Maclean Rogers.
Even if its origins cannot be traced to Greek civilisation, Europe was still 'forcefully and lastingly influenced by Graeco-Roman antiquity'.
It also has monuments that can be dated to the Graeco-Roman and Ptolemaic eras.
By the Graeco-Roman period, cats as the personification of the goddess Bastet, were deemed to be sacred animals and it was forbidden to remove them from Egypt.
The researchers believe that both manifestations of the cult of Graeco-Roman female goddesses can be dated to the end of the Roman period, but there is no doubt that the residence in which they were found continued to exist even after Christianity triumphed over idolatry.