Graeco-Roman


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Graeco-Roman

(esp US), Greco-Roman
1. of, characteristic of, or relating to Greek and Roman influences, as found in Roman sculpture
2. denoting a style of wrestling in which the legs may not be used to obtain a fall and no hold may be applied below the waist
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the scholarship on letters in the Graeco-Roman world focuses on language, content, variations in formula, and specific themes, says Sarri, but she is interested in the material format and other visual details that other scholars have neglected.
The extensive sections on the Graeco-Roman period, so often neglected in Egyptological studies, are very important and welcome.
In teams' ranking, the women's and men's free wrestling teams finished third while in Graeco-Roman wrestling, Tunisia ranked fourth.
The Graeco-Roman Museum remained an almost untouched Italian fiefdom, but everywhere else the French, British, and Germans were fighting it out for dominance.
Al-Arish National Museum is one of the few antiquities holders in North Sinai where there are lots of monuments from the Pharaonic period, Graeco-Roman era, drawings of the Coptic and Islamic antiques.
Contributors present interconnected studies of some of the most important moments and figures in the history of the comic genre and its reception from Graeco-Roman times to the present.
The Mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: Cult, Polis, and Change in the Graeco-Roman World, by Guy Maclean Rogers.
However, the Greek belles-lettres also developed a hostile tradition, even if it was never as prominent in the Graeco-Roman literature as the idealising tradition.
Even if its origins cannot be traced to Greek civilisation, Europe was still 'forcefully and lastingly influenced by Graeco-Roman antiquity'.
It also has monuments that can be dated to the Graeco-Roman and Ptolemaic eras.
By the Graeco-Roman period, cats as the personification of the goddess Bastet, were deemed to be sacred animals and it was forbidden to remove them from Egypt.
The researchers believe that both manifestations of the cult of Graeco-Roman female goddesses can be dated to the end of the Roman period, but there is no doubt that the residence in which they were found continued to exist even after Christianity triumphed over idolatry.