cereal

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cereal

1. any grass that produces an edible grain, such as oat, rye, wheat, rice, maize, sorghum, and millet
2. the grain produced by such a plant
3. of or relating to any of these plants or their products
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cereal

[′sir·ē·əl]
(botany)
Any member of the grass family (Graminae) which produces edible, starchy grains usable as food by humans and livestock. Also known as grain.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
d) To determine the antinutrient content and physicochemical properties in the amaranth grain product.
This research paper is intended to raise awareness of the benefits of whole grains in the diet as well as to educate the consumer on how to select whole grain products. Scientific studies are reviewed, and the beneficial effects of human consumption of whole grain foods are summarized.
"Many ethnic cuisines offer health benefits, especially those that focus on grain products, vegetables, legumes, and fruits," explains Cindy Moore, a Cleveland, Ohio, a registered dietitian and an ADA spokesperson.
The first tier would include those guidelines judged most important; i.e., eat a variety of foods; engage in physical activity to maintain or improve weight, and choose a diet with plenty of grain products, fruits, and vegetables, Applebaum said.
Since December 1998, all grain products sold in Canada have been fortified with folic acid with 0.15 mg of folate per 100 g of flour.
Choose more whole grain products. Ask for brown rice at your favorite Asian restaurants, and use more whole grain bread and pasta, barley, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, spelt, and kamut.
These are whole grain products for the 21st century, that combine the tastes and textures kids want with the healthy nutrients now required by law.
Folate, found in orange juice, dried beans, leafy greens and grain products, reduces blood levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that damages artery walls.
Careful scrutiny of data from NHANES III, a recent nationwide health and nutrition survey, showed that fortification of grain products with the B vitamin folate may help reduce memory loss in the over-60 set.
Consistent with dietary and health recommendations, Americans now consume two-fifths more grain products and a fifth more fruits and vegetables per capita than they did in 1970, eat leaner meat, and drink lower fat milk.