Grammatical Category

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Related to Grammatical categories: pronoun, syntax

Grammatical Category

 

(1) A class of mutually exclusive grammatical meanings opposed to each other according to some common feature; for example, the meanings “singular” and “plural” form the grammatical category of “number.” A paradigm (or series of paradigms) corresponds to each grammatical category.

(2) The term “grammatical category” is sometimes used to designate lexical-grammatical word classes (for example, in Russian the grammatical category “verb” has the grammatical categories of voice, aspect, mood, tense, person, number, and gender).

References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned previously, the main cause of the lack of consistency of results across studies appears to be the overlapping between grammatical categories and meaning (Vigliocco et al., 2011).
Further, the objects of perception are for Whorf a product not only of sensation, but of the action of grammatical categories as well; that of which the mind is ultimately aware would be the end product of the action of the grammatical categories, memories, and all associations which act upon the subjective datum.
Perceptual bases of rudimentary grammatical categories: toward a broader conceptualization of bootstrapping.
Adjective is one of the main grammatical categories that has significant syntactic and semantic role to play in language.
Chomsky notes that formal grammatical categories like nouns, verbs, adjectives and so on do not exist (sentence structures of all languages are represented by the same base phrase marker)(6) a theory of human language satisfies the condition of descriptive adequacy if it accounts for the properties of the language which a speaker knows (7) Chomsky focuses on the mind of a language learner/user.
Depending on the students' age and prior knowledge and the purpose of the task, there is flexibility in determining which grammatical categories will be identified.
Linguistically, the term has fostered inclusive and neutral language, based on the Sapir Whorf hypothesis that a language's grammatical categories can shape the speaker's ideas and actions.
This means that lexemes refer to something in the real world, whereas morphemes refer exclusively to universally available closed class grammatical categories (such as Tense, Aspect, and Number) and may consist of independent phonemic strings, affixes, infixes, changes in accent or tone, or even predictable omissions (zero morphemes).
I will rather analyze gender agreement across the DP (a, c, d) for both canonically and non-canonically feminine marked words, for pre-nominal and post nominal elements, and for grammatical categories.
537-79) and a statistical table, where their grammatical categories are quantified in figures and percentages (p.
* morphological text analysis to return the normalized form (the lemma) and the potential grammatical categories for all the words identified during the tokenization stage,