Grangemouth


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Grangemouth

(grānj`məth, –mouth), town (1981 pop. 21,744), Falkirk, central Scotland, on the Forth River at the eastern terminus of the Forth and Clyde canal. Grangemouth is an important oil and container port, with an oil refinery and large chemical works. Imports include timber, wood pulp, rubber, and large quantities of scrap metal used for the production of steel. Timber trade and sawmilling are also significant industries. Grangemouth was founded in 1777 to be the terminus of the canal, which opened in 1790. It was the scene of many experiments in steam navigation; the Charlotte Dundas was launched there in 1802.

Grangemouth

a port in Scotland, in Falkirk council area: now Scotland's second port, with oil refineries, shipyards, and chemical industries. Pop.: 17 771 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
About 110 people will transfer to Bilfinger UK from the previous contractor for the Grangemouth deal, which includes extension options.
Release date- 19082019 - Forth Ports today announces, in partnership with Direct Rail Services (DRS) and Eddie Stobart that the rail service which provides a regular weekend link between the Port of Tilbury and the Port of Grangemouth, Scotland's largest port is to be made permanent.
BP was persuaded by Scottish Oils to locate a refinery near Grangemouth rather than in north-east England due to its flat ground to the east, its transport links and most importantly, the rich vein of labour skilled in shale oil refining.
Ineos said the investment would secure 3000 jobs directly at Grangemouth and another 15,000 indirectly.
We know the threat that Carnegie pose, while Grangemouth have always been tough opponents whenever we have faced them.
Against Grangemouth the scores were: S Hope 17-10 D Donaldson; D Ross 15-16 G Moore; M Graham 19-12 J Milhench; M Cruz 18-13 I Staff.Totals: Stirling 69-57 Grangemouth.
Pupils at primary and secondary schools in Grangemouth were kept indoors at lunchtime as a precaution.
In response to the declining North Sea sources of hydrocarbons, Grangemouth's owners Ineos have invested a reported $1bn in a fleet of eight 'Dragon' ships which form a virtual 'pipeline' to bring US gas to Grangemouth for processing into various chemicals and plastics, saving this vital processing plant from closure.
"There simply is insufficient raw material (oil and gas) coming out of the North Sea to run Grangemouth so we're talking about 10,000 jobs in total that depend on that facility," Ratcliffe told BBC Radio Scotland.
"The site is undergoing a radical transformation with significant investment that will herald a new era in petrochemical manufacturing at Grangemouth," commented John McNally, CEO INEOS Olefins and Polymers (O&P UK).