graphics adaptor

graphics adaptor

(hardware, graphics)
(Or "graphics adapter", "graphics card", "video adaptor", etc.) A circuit board fitted to a computer, especially an IBM PC, containing the necessary video memory and other electronics to provide a bitmap display.

Adaptors vary in the resolution (number of pixels) and number of colours they can display, and in the refresh rate they support. These parameters are also limited by the monitor to which the adaptor is connected. A number of such display standards, e.g. SVGA, have become common and different software requires or supports different sets.
References in periodicals archive ?
System requirements for the Creative PC-DVD kit are a Pentium 133MHz computer with at least 16Mbytes of RAM, a PCI bus with 33MHz clock speed, Sound Blaster 16 or compatible audio card, Microsoft Windows 95 and a SVGA graphics adaptor with 2Mbytes of memory.
For users who do not have a color graphics adaptor (CGA) or better graphics, ECGs for each case are supplied with the documentation.
Generations include CGA, EGA, VGA, and now SVGA (Super Video Graphics Adaptor).
Most graphics adaptor cards fall into one of the following categories:
To operate on a DOS platform, the product requires MS Windows 3.0, Windows compatible graphics adaptor, PC compatible CD-ROM drive, Microsoft extensions 2.x, DOS 3.1 or later and 640K memory.
The major screen display options supported by most graphics programs are 1) Hercules-compatible, high-resolution, monochrome display hardware (gray shades but no colors); 2) a color graphics adaptor (CGA) for low-resoultion color; 3) an enhanced color adaptor (EGA) with resolution close to the Hercules display; and 4) a video graphics adaptor, the new IBM standard, superior to the EGA in number of colors and resolution.