graveyard spiral


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graveyard spiral

graveyard spiral
An illusion that a pilot can experience when he or she returns to level flight after an intentional or unintentional prolonged bank turn. A pilot who enters a banking turn to the left will initially have a sensation of turning in the same direction. If the left turn continues for 20 s or more, the pilot is likely to feel that the airplane is no longer turning to the left. If the pilot attempts to level the wings at this point, this action will produce a compelling sensation that the airplane is turning and banking to the right. Failure to check the instruments may lead the pilot to reenter the original left turn in an attempt to counteract the sensation of a right turn, but the airplane is still turning to the left and losing altitude. If the disoriented pilot pulls back on the controls, the spiral will tighten and the loss of altitude will increase, making the situation even worse.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am imagining that this technique will completely avoid the risk of the graveyard spiral. I would love to hear what you and your readers will have to say about this.
The resulting graveyard spiral could precipitate a loss of control.
The new normal is actually a graveyard spiral where we lay employee-customers off to accommodate reduced demand, which reduces demand even further, causing another layoff.
I wanted to roll the aircraft 90 degrees to the left to commence my graveyard spiral straight into the Florida panhandle.
Instead of immediately recognizing/confirming/recovering, I added back stick pressure to maintain my altitude, thus beginning a graveyard spiral which could have ended in collision with the ground 30 seconds later.
"Kennedy was in a graveyard spiral, the needles on the dials spun like pin wheels.
The pilot reacts to the increased airspeed with back pressure, tightening the turn and increasing the rate of descent into what was known even then as the "graveyard spiral." Pilots who avoid an unintended bank are prone to begin overcontrolling as they chase the airspeed indicator and altimeter, falling farther and farther behind the airplane.
During the first pre-training exercise, 19 of 20 pilots entered graveyard spirals. The 20th got into an exaggerated nose-high attitude that the instructor recovered before the incipient whip-stall could develop.
Afterwards, I talked to the CFI who explained the graveyard spiral. I thought unusual attitude recovery was easy--it was when I practiced under the hood.
It describes a classic "graveyard spiral," from the airplane's cruising altitude to the ground in less than a minute, the FAA's Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA H-8083-25A) has this to say about graveyard spirals:
* With the exception of the last scenario, attempted maneuvers exceeding the airplane's capabilities, all the above events have something in common--the so-called "graveyard spiral."