graze

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graze

[grāz]
(ordnance)
To pass close to the surface, as a shot that follows a path nearly parallel to the ground and low enough to strike a standing person.
Burst of a projectile at the instant of impact with the ground. Also known as graze burst.
In time fire, a burst on impact with the ground or other material object on a level with or below the target.
(vertebrate zoology)
To feed by browsing on, cropping, and eating grass.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Illegal grazers in the Tsavo National Park and ranches have been blamed for persistent human-wildlife conflict in Taita Taveta County.
Net growth was the growth achieved by the fronds minus the biomass consumed by grazers. To determine net growth, the U.
"If we take away both the predators and the grazers," says Savory, "we have total rest.
Only six of the 18 chapters discuss responses to both pathogens and grazers, highlighting their similarities and differences and exposing interesting parallels and directions for future research.
A final issue in comparing effects of different grazers is the relevant "normal" treatment against which to compare the grazer-exclusion treatments.
The three pools without grazers served as controls (CONT).
Our laboratory studies of what happens to colloidal iron oxides ingested by protozoans show that protozoan grazers can greatly accelerate the production of dissolved and chemically reactive iron from colloidal iron oxides in seawater.
Grazers often have convictions about not eating foods that have been illegitimatized by the news.
The picture caption in "Ancient Grazers: Find adds grass to dinosaur menu" (SN: 11/19/05, p.
In this paper, we present a simple mathematical model for an exploitation competition system consisting of a single resource species and two mobile consumer species with complementary foraging behaviors: "diggers," which can extract resources at low levels, and "grazers," which are poorer within-patch exploiters, but can potentially find good patches more quickly.
The particular models presented in this paper are motivated by our empirical work in stream systems consisting of benthic algae, invertebrate grazers, and vertebrate and invertebrate predators (Cooper et al.
To measure the effect of grazers, we compared the standing stocks of microalgae in sediments of each estuary to standing stocks in sediments from which we excluded macroherbivores (including snails, shrimp, fish).