Great Chicago Fire

Great Chicago Fire

destroyed much of Chicago; it was supposedly started when Mrs. O’Leary’s cow kicked over a lantern (1871). [Am. Hist.: Payton, 141]
See: Fire
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 30-year-old widow relocated to Chicago to start anew with a dress shop, but it was lost in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
Spafford had lost everything in the great Chicago fire of 1871.
He became Chicago's first mayor, built the city's first railway system, and suffered through the Great Chicago Fire. His diverse business interests included real estate, land development, city planning, urban transportation, manufacturing, beer brewing, mining, and banking, to name a few.
History hasn't paid much attention to this confluence of Midwestern fires in a hot, dry autumn; they were overshadowed by the Great Chicago Fire that also started on October 8, 1871.
| October 8 THE "Great Chicago Fire" started this evening in 1871 causing almost 300 fatalities and leaving 100,000 people homeless.
Growing up in the Midwest and having visited Chicago a few times already in my early years, I saw firsthand how the Second City had to rebuild because of the Great Chicago Fire.
1871, the Great Chicago Fire destroyed three miles of it, killing and leaving 100,000 homeless.
To truly take in the city's range of architecture styles, hop on board a 90-minute Chicago Architecture Foundation River Cruise (architecture.org, $47) which takes you on a historical tour of what has been a constantly-changing horizon ever since much the city was destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
In his book he recalls how more than 700 people died in a heat wave in 1995, more than twice as many people who died during the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
Four years later, her shop was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
However, events such as the 1905 Armstrong Investigation and the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, "which left people unwilling to invest in insurance companies--which they saw as risky businesses," eventually changed that, said Joseph M.
This service included engravings depicting the Great Chicago Fire and Fort Dearborn in Illinois.