Clay Belt

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Clay Belt

[′klā ‚belt]
(geology)
A lowland area bordering on the western and southern portions of Hudson and James bays in Canada, composed of clays and silts recently deposited in large glacial lakes during the withdrawal of the continental glaciers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cobalt once spawned 100 mines in the town limits in its heyday, but there were operating mines in the farming areas of the Great Clay Belt.
possesses the Great Clay Belt, containing many millions of acres of fine farming land.
About this time, the Government of Ontario was becoming interested in development in its northern territory to take advantage of the transcontinental railway bisecting the Great Clay Belt and connecting to Quebec City and the Pacific coast.
An example of choosing a boreal site as a way out of a refugee situation is seen in the Mennonite settlement at Reesor in the Great Clay Belt of northern Ontario.
In northern Ontario in 1912, climatic conditions were declared to be 'still imperfectly known', although there was a thirteen-year record applicable at least to the eastern Great Clay Belt and adjacent Abitibi.
A demonstration farm was established at Monteith, near Matheson, in the southern arm of the Great Clay Belt, in 1908.
By comparison, the average annual precipitation in the Ontario Great Clay Belt over the period 1931-1964 was 31 inches (approximately 78 cm) (Chapman and Thomas 1968, Table 4 therein).
Good farmland was being found in the so-called Little Clay Belt, extending north and west from Lake Timiskaming, and interest was stirring over the unopened Great Clay Belt 100 km further north (500 km north of agricultural southern Ontario).
A township on the railway line near the centre of the Great Clay Belt in Ontario was identified for exclusive settlement by the Bruce group.
Even the Mennonites, who chose an area in the Great Clay Belt at Reesor 50 km west of Kapuskasing in the mid-1920s, found that their usually formidable co-operative organization could only maintain their settlement for a few years beyond the Second World War.
Continuing the Great Clay Belt of Ontario (Cochrane District) towards the east was the similar expanse of post-glacial lake deposits in Abitibi.
Escalating land prices in southern Ontario, coupled with the need for sustainable agriculture and climate change, has garnered the Great Clay Belt region attention over the past number of years.