cormorant

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cormorant

(kôr`mərənt), common name for large aquatic birds, related to the gannet and the pelican, and found chiefly in temperate and tropical regions, usually on the sea but also on inland waters. Cormorants are 2 to 3 ft (61–92 cm) long, with thick, generally dark plumage and green eyes. The feet are webbed, and the bill is long with the upper mandible terminally hooked. Expert swimmers, cormorants pursue fish underwater. In Asia they are used by fishermen who collar the leashed birds to prevent them from swallowing the catch. The double-crested cormorant of the Atlantic coast, Brandt's cormorant of the Pacific coast, and the red-faced cormorant, Phalacrocorax urile, are common forms. The glossy black European cormorant is widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. A South American cormorant is a source of guano. The great cormorant nests high in trees or, as in other species, on steep, rocky sea cliffs. Two to six eggs per clutch are laid by the female. The young are born blind, and the parents feed the nestlings with half-digested food which is dropped into the nests. Later, the young birds poke their heads into the gullet of the adults to feed. Cormorants are long-lived; a banded one was observed after 18 years. Cormorants are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Pelecaniformes, family Phalacrocoracidae.

cormorant

any aquatic bird of the family Phalacrocoracidae, of coastal and inland waters, having a dark plumage, a long neck and body, and a slender hooked beak: order Pelecaniformes (pelicans, etc.)
References in periodicals archive ?
787), a species that breeds only as far north as the Alaska Peninsula and Near Islands in the Aleutian chain, was included as an "Arctic" species, while the great cormorant, which breeds along the coast of southwest Greenland, was not.
A single dataset on Great cormorants illustrates the estimation of key demographic parameters of survival probability from data collected on individually identifiable animals, and the fitting of a two-capture mixture model to single site breeding data.
Nine HPAI viruses (H5N1) were isolated in 2009 and 2 were isolated in 2010 from great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo), brown-headed gulls (Chroicocephalus brunnicephalus), great blackheaded gulls (Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus), great-crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus), and bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) and serotyped as described (3).

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