Great Dark Spot


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Great Dark Spot

A prominent feature in Neptune's atmosphere, similar in many ways to Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The Great Dark Spot measures roughly 12 000 km by 8000 km and, scaled down by the same factor that Neptune's diameter is smaller than Jupiter's, occupies a similar proportion of surface area to that occupied by the Great Red Spot. The Great Dark Spot is a high-pressure system around which winds flow in a counterclockwise direction. Wind speeds around the Great Dark Spot are near supersonic at about 700 m s–1.
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The spot is probably an enormous, rotating storm, like Jupiter's long-standing Great Red Spot, Neptune's Great Dark Spot, and Saturn's Great White Spots.
We've grown familiar with them, from Mercury with its shriveled surface to Neptune with its Great Dark Spot.
August 1989 Voyager 2 remains the only spacecraft to visit the windiest planet in the solar system: Near the Great Dark Spot, hurricane winds rage over 2,000 km (1,500 mi) per hour.
In 1989, Voyager flew past Neptune and spied another storm, dubbed the Great Dark Spot because of its appearance in visible light.
Like Jupiter, with its Great Red Spot, Neptune has an especially turbulent atmospheric storm-as large in diameter as the planet Earth-that scientists have dubbed the Great Dark Spot.
That first year, they were astonished to find that Neptune's Great Dark Spot, the dominant feature seen by the Voyager spacecraft, had vanished (SN: 10/30/93, p.
Dominating the Voyager images is a murky oval dubbed the Great Dark Spot (GDS), as well as smaller Dark Spot 2 (DS2).
New images of Neptune revealed that the planet's Great Dark Spot has vanished (146: 312).
Both sets of images confirm that Neptune's Great Dark Spot -- a major storm feature seen by Voyager 2 -- has vanished.
We hope to glimpse the Great Dark Spot but do not see it.
Voyager 2 had discovered several large features, such as the Great Dark Spot, a counterclockwise storm about the size of Earth.