Alföld

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Alföld

(ôl`föld), Hun. Nagy-Alföld [Great Alföld], great central plain of Hungary extending into Serbia and W Romania. The level region is drained by the Tisza and Danube rivers. Formerly wooded, the Alföld gradually became a steppe region as the Magyar and then the Mongol invaders (13th cent.) cut down many trees, exposing the soil to dry winds. Grasslands covered most of the Alföld until the late 19th cent., when extensive irrigation and drainage projects transformed parts of it into fertile farmland; grains, vegetables, feed crops, and livestock are now raised. The Alföld, on a primary invasion route to Europe, has been the scene of many major battles. The Little Alföld (Hun. Kis-Alföld) is located in NW Hungary and extends into S Slovakia and Austria.

Alföld

 

(from Hungarian alfold, lowland), lowlands in Hungary, leading into the middle Danube Valley. In the broad sense an alföld is a valley with fertile soil suitable for growing grain (as opposed to puszta, which are pasturelands).

References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, Erika Gal has collated the avian remains from 27 Neolithic and 15 Chalcolithic sites within eastern Romania and the Great Hungarian Plain.
Piroska Szanto in her art and writing has remained faithful to her roots in the dusty market town on the Great Hungarian Plain where she was born.
EASTERN EUROPE BY RAIL: Great Rail Journeys (01904 521 980) offers 14-day Hungarian tour by rail from April 17, via Vienna, Budapest and Prague, incl unforgettable day on Great Hungarian Plain with typical gypsy lunch.
EASTERN EUROPE BY RAIL Great Rail Journeys (01904 521 980) offers 14-day Hungarian tour by rail from April 17, via Vienna, Budapest and Prague, incl unforgettable day on Great Hungarian Plain with typical gypsy lunch.
Their name translates a Southern Plains Saxophone Ensemble and they come from the Great Hungarian Plains.
Her mother's people had lost their wealth but enjoyed the support of the community of a solid Protestant town with fierce parochial loyalties, out in the great Hungarian plains.
The unnamed setting is recognizable Tar-turf also, most likely the city of Debrecen, the historical Protestant "bastion" of the Great Hungarian Plains in the northeast.