Great Miami

Great Miami,

river: see MiamiMiami
or Great Miami,
river, c.160 mi (260 km) long, formed in W Ohio near Indian Lake and flowing generally SW past Dayton to the Ohio River at the Ind. line. The Miami River system has large-scale flood-control projects. The Miami and Erie Canal (c.
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, river.
References in classic literature ?
The hostile disposition of the savages, and their allies, caused General Clark, the commandant at the Falls of the Ohio, immediately to begin an expedition with his own regiment, and the armed force of the country, against Pecaway, the principal town of the Shawanese, on a branch of Great Miami, which he finished with great success, took seventeen scalps, and burnt the town to ashes, with the loss of seventeen men.
Great Miami Beach location across the street from the ocean, near hotels, restaurants, public beaches and lots of parking.
5 million proposal to fund upgrades to its downtown park on the Great Miami River.
The study calculates that the Great Miami Hurricane of 1926 would be the most expensive, costing an estimated $125 million if it occurred nowadays, followed by the Okeechobee Hurricane of 1928, which would cost $65 billion.
It just so happens, a few miles away, the Great Miami River has a lot of gravel to give.
The most damaging storm was easily the Great Miami Hurricane of 1926, which at $157 billion when adjusted for inflation and current population increases and development, nearly doubles the $80 billion pricetag of Hurricane Katrina.
Topping the list: the Great Miami Hurricane, a category 4 cyclone that in 1926 was responsible for $100 million in damages; when adjusted to 2005 values, the storm damage was $139.
Fifth Street Bridge over the Great Miami River, Dayton, Ohio
In the 1920s in the village of Pontiac, Ohio, on the banks of the Great Miami River in a small grove where the famous chief once camped, the Fourth of July was celebrated with speeches and music by the village band.
Reminders of the cleanup operations that will remain after closure include a water treatment plant to pump and treat remaining levels of uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer until the drinking water standard is met, likely to take 10 years, and a 110-acre On-Site Disposal Facility which securely holds building debris and contaminated soil in between thick liners and caps consisting of strong synthetic material, clays, heavy rock and clean soil.
In general, the improvements for which bids are requested will consist of the following: Construct approximately 300 foot concrete trail through the concrete revetment on Great Miami River at RiversEdge Amphitheater Park.
5 million, the Stewart Street bridge over the Great Miami River in Dayton opened to traffic in November.