Great Russians

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Great Russians

 

a name for Russians that came into usage in literature as of the mid-19th century. In Soviet scientific literature, the term “Great Russian” is retained in the combinations Northern Great Russian, Southern Great Russian, and Central Great Russian, which designate the three main dialects of the Russian language.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abu-Ghazaleh concluded by saying "I am proud to be part of such a great Forum which provided a unique opportunity to know more about the great Russia."
More recently, several hawks in the Kremlins military and political establishment have developed a vision of a "Great Russia" with strong ties to the former Soviet republics in Central Asia, reflecting Russia's increasingly status-driven posture in international politics.
Though none of this helped Russians economically, much less expanded their freedoms, it established Putin as a champion of "Great Russia." After Russia invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea in March 2014 -- unapologetically defying the West -- his approval rating reached a dizzyingly high 87 per cent.
In order to establish a new 'VelikoRussia' (Great Russia) after the Soviet era, Putin appealed to the reinvention of tradition, which dates back to the early Kiev Rus and Muscovy medieval eras and to the Romanov dynasty in modern times.
"For one group of people, the revolution was the death knell of Great Russia - it was 'Brexit,' when we stopped our development in Europe," Mikhail Shvydkoy, Putin's special representative on cultural matters told The New York Times.
While Russians are accustomed to viewing Russia as a great power with global commitments, 49 percent would like to see Russia "as a country with high standards of life." Another poll reported that 64 percent of Russians understand the concept of a "Great Russia" as having a developed economy; only 44 percent understand greatness as having a powerful army, and a mere 10 percent support Russian expansion.
Among other things, Clarke has said he'd like to "strangle" Democrats, has travelled to Russia (strangely at the same time Mike Flynn was there) and talked about how great Russia is, and has compared the Black Lives Matter movement to the Ku Klux Klan.
A sustained fall in living standards could offset the feeling of pride in 'Great Russia' that Putin's core supporters are feeling now, and could threaten his re-election in 2018.
But the "Great Russia" nationalism that he has stirred up to mobilize popular support for his Ukraine policy is hardly more appealing.
But we are in Great Britain, not Great Russia. We are already a well-watched country, yet they seem to want to extend that.