Great Russians


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Great Russians

 

a name for Russians that came into usage in literature as of the mid-19th century. In Soviet scientific literature, the term “Great Russian” is retained in the combinations Northern Great Russian, Southern Great Russian, and Central Great Russian, which designate the three main dialects of the Russian language.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus two features stand out in the composition of the future prelates as the ancien regime drifted towards revolution: first, by the early nineteenth century the bishops came to represent all parts of the vast Empire, a development which signaled an end to Great Russian hegemony in education.
While Peter the Great had consciously turned to Ukrainian bishops and while Catherine the Great had reverted to Great Russian candidates (even if these were graduates of the new, Petrine institutions of ecclesiastical education), in the nineteenth century bishops came from all over the Russian Empire.
Only sixteen were Great Russian. One bishop's heritage is ambiguous.
(14.) For a summary of the causes explaining the change from non-Great Russian to Great Russian bishops see Bryner, 36-38.