Carcinus maenas

(redirected from Green crabs)

Carcinus maenas

[¦kär·sən·əs ′mī·nəs]
(invertebrate zoology)
A decapod crustacean commonly found on the coasts of northwest Europe and the northeast United States that feeds on invertebrates such as mollusks, polychaete worms, and other crustaceans, and periodically sheds its exoskeleton in order to grow. Also known as shore crab.
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She could understand it--understand the green crabs with white- bleached claws that scuttled before her and which she could see pasturing on green-weeded rocks when the tide was low.
Salinity tolerance in color phases of female green crabs, Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758).
In 2012 the Welsh crustacean fishery landed 1,300 tonnes of lobsters, crawfish, and spider, velvet and green crabs at a value of PS3.
Homogenization of the eyestalk and re-injection into ESA green crabs abolishes the effect of ESA (Henry, 2006a, b).
There are green crabs from Weymouth as well as lobsters, soft shell crabs, squid, live clams and winkles.
As for other crabs, spider crabs and green crabs are inedible.
Green crabs, which were introduced into Raritan Bay from Europe a century ago, have also spread to Maine, where they have damaged shell fisheries, Weis said.
Answers: 1) 3 blue crabs + 2 green crabs = 5 crabs; 2) 4 seagulls + 3 blackbirds = 7 birds; 3) 4 minnows + 2 salmon = 6 fish
If eiders can't get mussels," Ellis said, "they'll eat snails and crabs--mainly Asian shore crabs and green crabs, because that is what's available.
Darwinian Snails looks at the underlying principles of natural selection using green crabs preying on periwinkle snails.
In a rare analysis of one marine invader benefiting an earlier arrival, an ecologist says that European green crabs invading a California bay have triggered a population explosion of a previously marginal clam.