inland ice

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inland ice

[′in·lənd ′īs]
(hydrology)
Ice composing the inner portion of a continental glacier or large ice sheet; applied particularly to Greenland ice.
References in periodicals archive ?
July saw unprecedented melting of the Greenland ice sheet, with 12 billion tonnes of ice flowing into the sea.
A Cambridge scientist has warned that the "decaying" of the Greenland ice sheet risks pushing up the sea level and threatens coastal cities around the world.
The area of the Greenland ice sheet that is showing indications of melt has been growing daily, and hit a record 56.5% for this year on Wednesday, said Ruth Mottram, a climate scientist with the Danish Meteorological Institute.
Wildfires raging in the Arctic Circle and the dramatic melting of the Greenland ice sheet are climate change warning signs we must not ignore.
Mottram said since June 1 roughly the start of the ice-loss season the Greenland ice sheet has lost 240 gigatons (240 billion metric tons) this year.
Mottram said since June 1 -- roughly the start of the ice-loss season -- the Greenland ice sheet has lost 240 gigatons (240 billion metric tons) this year.
"This will result in high temperatures and consequently enhanced melting of the Greenland ice sheet," she said.
Potential contributions from the Greenland ice sheet and the ice sheets in West Antarctica represent the greatest uncertainties.
After using satellite and aerial photos, ice cores, and other observational data to help refine the models, the researchers applied them to 260 glaciers on the Greenland Ice Sheet for the years 1972-2018 and found that the overall amount of melting began to surpass mass accumulation in the 1980s, with a loss of 47 gigatons of ice per year throughout the 1980s and 1990s, 187 gigatons per year through the 2000s, and 286 gigatons per year since 2010.
To get new measurements of the melting ice, the researchers did a reconstruction of the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet for the past 46 years.
This programme aims to develop a deeper understanding of climate change and the response of the ice sheets so that we can improve our ability to explain the risk of future Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet loss and its impact on sea level.
According to the study which was conducted by researchers from CU Boulder, the University of Copenhagen, Arizona State University and the Rhode Island School of Design, the melting Greenland ice sheet delivers an enormous amount of sediments to the coast.