Gregory VII


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Gregory VII

Saint, monastic name Hildebrand. ?1020--85, pope (1073-- 85), who did much to reform abuses in the Church. His assertion of papal supremacy and his prohibition (1075) of lay investiture was opposed by the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV, whom he excommunicated (1076). He was driven into exile when Henry captured Rome (1084). Feast day: May 25
References in periodicals archive ?
However, she had managed to obtain crucial triumphs such as the liberation of Pope Gregory VII or the defeat of the imperial troops of Henry IV at Canossa in 1092--forcing the emperor to withdraw from Italy--that secured her an indelible legacy.
Later that same year, Gregory VII did indeed show himself capable of doing more than all by not only excommunicating Henry IV, but deposing him--a dual sentence that nearly cost the German king his throne.
8 In a famous 11th-century incident, Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV had to stand outside in the snow for three days before being granted absolution by Pope Gregory VII - at which Italian castle?
The book begins with a historical tour from ancient China and Rome through the pro-market reforms of Pope Gregory VII in the 11th century to the "intensive" economic growth launched by the ideas of Adam Smith and the policies of the British government in the 19th century.
This is followed by Robinson's second chapter, a disproportionately lengthy and rather exhaustive discussion of the policies of the reforming popes from Gregory VII through Innocent III, under the rubric "The Institutions of the Church.
On This Day: 1074: Pope Gregory VII ex-communicated all married priests.
Saint Gregory ordered them to be burnt and, again, in the eleventh century Pope Gregory VII authorized a public burning.
Matilda of Canossa (1046-1115) was the Countess of Tuscany and lover to Pope Gregory VII One of the most famous tales that is told of her is how she fought the armies of the German king, Henry IV, through this alliance and humbled him completely.
The article refers to the struggle between King Henry IV "of England" and Pope Gregory VII.
The latter had called for the reform of the clergy, demanding true celibacy and the abolition of simony for which they received support from Pope Gregory VII.
Mineo's evaluation of Dante's dream for earthly harmony encompasses the creation of mankind (created to replace the fallen angels), the Augustinian concept of the Roman Empire as remedium peccati, the dictatus papae of Gregory VII, and the court of Frederick II.