Gregory VII


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Gregory VII

Saint, monastic name Hildebrand. ?1020--85, pope (1073-- 85), who did much to reform abuses in the Church. His assertion of papal supremacy and his prohibition (1075) of lay investiture was opposed by the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV, whom he excommunicated (1076). He was driven into exile when Henry captured Rome (1084). Feast day: May 25
References in periodicals archive ?
To deal with this predation, Pope Gregory VII instigated his papal revolution in 1075 by putting the claims of God, enforced by the spiritual weapon of excommunication, above those of Caesar.
Galileo was an arrogant man who insulted his friend and supporter, Pope Gregory VII.
Pope Gregory VII demanded a retraction from Berengar saying that the body and blood of Christ were truly present in the Eucharist.
Silvester II, who had the misfortune to be pope at the turn of the millennium, when the devil was allegedly loosed from hell, received close attention from Bale and Foxe as did Gregory VII, champion of papal reform and power.
Beginning in the mid-11th century as a dispute between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII over who would control appointments of church officials, the Investiture Contest would rage for decades until its resolution in 1122.
On This Day: 1074: Pope Gregory VII excommunicated all married priests.
In a celebrated incident from 1076, for example, Pope Gregory VII and King Henry IV of England fell into a dispute over who should have the power to name church bishops--church leaders or government officials.
It was, according to the author, Pope Gregory VII who was the first to affirm that "taking part in war of a certain kind could be an act of charity to which merit was attached" (p.
The Corsicans recognize the sovereignty of Pope Gregory VII.
EXCOMMUNICATION WAS ONCE CONSIDERED A PASSE feature of the ancient church, conjuring up images of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV walking barefoot in the snow in 1077 to Canossa to seek the mercy of Pope Gregory VII.
It was introduced in the West in the 11th century by monks (who freely chose celibacy), in particular by Pope Gregory VII, and against the vigorous opposition of the clergy in Italy and even more in Germany, where only three bishops dared to promulgate the Roman decree.
Revising his doctoral dissertation in history at Trinity College, Dublin, where he teaches today, Healy discusses Hugh's account of the conflict between Pope Gregory VII (r.