Gregory XIII


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Gregory XIII,

1502–85, pope (1572–85), an Italian named Ugo Buoncompagni, b. Bologna; successor of St. Pius VPius V, Saint,
1504–72, pope (1566–72), an Italian named Michele Ghislieri, b. near Alessandria; successor of Pius IV. He was ordained in the Dominicans (1528) and became celebrated for his austerity.
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. He is best known for his work on the calendarcalendar
[Lat., from Kalends], system of reckoning time for the practical purpose of recording past events and calculating dates for future plans. The calendar is based on noting ordinary and easily observable natural events, the cycle of the sun through the seasons with equinox
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, and the reformed calendar, the Gregorian, is named for him. He was prominent at the Council of Trent (1545, 1559–63; see Trent, Council ofTrent, Council of,
1545–47, 1551–52, 1562–63, 19th ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church, convoked to meet the crisis of the Protestant Reformation.
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) and in the work of reform thereafter. He was created (1564) cardinal and later was legate to Spain. As pope, Gregory's absorbing interests were the education of the clergy and the conversion of Protestants. He especially patronized the Jesuits, whom he encouraged on their many missions, particularly in N Europe and in Japan. He proposed the deposition of Queen Elizabeth of England, and he advocated no compromise with German Protestants. He has been much criticized for a public thanksgiving at Rome for the massacre of Saint Bartholomew's DaySaint Bartholomew's Day, massacre of,
murder of French Protestants, or Huguenots, that began in Paris on Aug. 24, 1572. It was preceded, on Aug. 22, by an attempt, ordered by Catherine de' Medici, on the life of the Huguenot leader Admiral Coligny.
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, but he had been told that it was the suppression of a rebellion. He issued a new edition of the canon law. He was succeeded by Sixtus VSixtus V,
1521–90, pope (1585–90), an Italian (b. near Montalto) named Felice Peretti; successor of Gregory XIII. He entered the Franciscan order in early youth.
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.

Gregory XIII

1502--85, pope (1572--85). He promoted the Counter-Reformation and founded seminaries. His reformed (Gregorian) calendar was issued in 1582
References in periodicals archive ?
Pope Gregory XIII, born Ugo Buoncompagni in Bologna in 1502, also carried a personal devotion to the Madonna del Soccorso.
In October 1582, thanks to Pope Gregory XIII and his bull 'Inter Gravissimas' that established the new calendar we call 'Gregorian', many Europeans went to bed on the fourth of that month and awoke on the fifteenth.
The Collegio Ponticifio Papio was founded in the 16th century by Bartolomeo Papio (1526-1580) on the orders of Pope Gregory XIII.
The year 1582 was shortened by ten days by Pope Gregory XIII to bring the calendar in line with the seasons; the old Julian calendar, which Pope Gregory replaced, made a year slightly too long.
In his poem about Saint Catherine's Day in Zemaitija, the poet makes reference to the controversial Gregory XIII by proclaiming that the pope's "rotten pages .
The Vatican Observatory traces its roots to the reform of the calendar under Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 with the assistance of Jesuit scientists at the Roman College.
By 1582, it was 10 days out of sync, so Pope Gregory XIII decreed that 10 days should be lost to put things right.
INDEPENDENCEDAY IN ESTONIA 1582: Pope Gregory XIII announced the Gregorian calendar, replacing the Julian calendar.
Within the Roman College of the Society of Jesus, where Galileo had made both respectful friends and bitter enemies, the controversy took on particular urgency, for the College had ranked as one of the foremost European centers for astronomical research ever since Father Christoph Clavius led the team that reformed the calendar for Pope Gregory XIII in the early 1580s.
In 1528 Pope Gregory XIII discovered that there was an error to the original Julian Calendar and because of his efforts, the Gregorian Calendar of seven months of 31 days, four months of 30 days and a leap year was adopted.
It's a curious fact, then, that it was a Christian Pope - Gregory XIII,
Exactly 415 years ago today the Gregorian calendar, the world's most widely used calendar, was introduced by a papal bull from Pope Gregory XIII - and threw the world into a time-warp.