Grettir the Strong

Grettir the Strong

Viking adventurer whose exploits are related in The Grettisaga. [Icelandic Lit.: Magill I, 335]
See: Heroism
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Zironi identifies Morris's consistent preference for stories of human drama rather than the more mythological subjects of the Eddas, and he suggests explanations for the deep emotional appeal that stories such as Gunnlaug the Worm-tongue and Grettir the Strong held for him.
Later this season the theatre will also premiere Grettir the Strong, a uniquely Nordic musical take on celebrity.
The sword then reappears in The Saga of Grettir the Strong when Grettir's mother, Jokul's granddaughter, passes it on to him: Then she took an inlaid sword from under her cloak, a fine piece of workmanship.
A good example occurs in The Saga of Grettir the Strong, when the hero is staying with the farmer Audun and witnesses a huge burst of fire on a headland below the farm.
(14) After he decided on the form of The Earthly Paradise's monthly lyrics--three seven-line stanzas for greater fullness and balance--he never again returned to the sonnet, with the exception of two drafts for introductory poems to his 1869 translation of the Icelandic saga "Grettir the Strong." (15)
Everywhere he went were reminders of the heroic days of the sagas: Gunnar's Howe, the home of Gudrun, places associated with Grettir the Strong. One guide, Thorstein, points out saga sites as if the inhabitants were still his neighbors, and a host almost quarrels with Morris "for saying some ill of Snorri the Priest" dead a thousand years (Journals 99).