Grettir

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Grettir

Viking adventurer, outlawed for his ruthless slayings. [Icelandic Lit.: Grettir the Strong in Magill I, 335]
References in periodicals archive ?
Slavica Rankovic challenges the modern reader to make sense of the paradoxically different and yet same characters (such as J>orgeror Egilssdottir in both Laxdoela saga and Egils saga) and objects (such as Bergr the sword in both Vatnsdoela saga and Grettis saga) across different sagas, using for insight the iterative and socially embedded sense of saga as 'performance'.
Grettir's Last Stand and the Icelandic Frontier: Frank Norris's Retelling of the 13th-century Grettis Saga. Ilse A.
American author Frank Norris's 1890 short story, "Grettir at Drangey," overlooked by most readers and often elided from collections of his works, is a reworking of the 13th-century Icelandic Grettis Saga. By comparing Norris's retelling with both the original Icelandic text and the translation(s) that would have been available to him, we see that Norris has removed the sprawling social and family trees, insights into law and society, supernatural occurrences, and ultimately international ending of the original text, providing us with only Grettir's death on a secluded cliff-island off the coast of Iceland.
(24) While critics busily sought after and debated the possible links between elements of the Beowulf-narrative and the folk traditions of Germanic cultures exterior to the British Isles, special significance fell on the saga literature of Iceland, Grettis saga and Hrolfs saga kraka in particular.
The remaining chapters are case studies of family sagas: 'The Community and the Individual in Eyrbyggja Saga',' Speech, Silence and Subjectivity in Gisla Saga', and 'Grettis Saga and the Fictionalization of Biography', rounded off with a contrastive 'Epilogue: Hrafnkels Saga and the Hero without Verse'.
The final chapter returns to the much-discussed issue of parallels between Beowulf and Grettis saga, discerning five separate episodes in the latter that not only analogize Beowulf's monstrous battles but also form the structural core of the saga.
In addition, Dr Orchard includes discussions of two other sources with similar preoccupations: the Liber monstrorum, perhaps best known for its reference to King Hygelac, and the Old Icelandic Grettis saga Asmundarsonar.
Grettis saga Latest and one of the finest of the ICELANDERS' SAGAS, written about 1320.
Egils saga, Chs 16-17; Finnboga saga, Chs 30, 32-33; Grettis saga, Chs 51, 72, 84; Gunnlaugs saga, Ch.
Orchard sees elements of narrative parallelism between principal episodes in Grettis saga and Beowulf, but they prove little except that certain types of narratives have basic materials (giants, trolls, and the like) common to the genre.
To this group belong Hardar saga ok Holmverja and Droplaugarsona saga, but the greatest of the outlaw sagas are Gisla saga and Grettis saga.
Of higher artistic quality are the "Icelanders' sagas," such as the 13th-century Grettis saga and Njals saga, dealing with native Icelandic families.