gray goo

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gray goo

A science fiction nightmare from "Engines of Creation, The Coming Era of Nanotechnology" by K. Eric Drexler, in which nanomachines were named "assemblers." An assembler is created from organic molecules and is designed to replicate itself. However, if something goes amiss, they could replicate until all that is left on the planet, now void of all organic matter, is "gray goo." See nanofactory.
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EA will be developing the remastered collection of "Command & Conquer" alongside Petroglyph Games, the same developer behind "Star Wars: Empire at War" and "Grey Goo," according to (https://www.polygon.com/2018/11/14/18095301/command-conquer-remastered-red-alert-ea-petroglyph) Polygon .
To complicate things further, nanotech and nanoscience are now popularly synonymous with "miniature robots that will turn the world into grey goo" or miniscule invisible threatsto our health and environment.
They discuss nine different world-ending events from the "grey goo" of self-replicating nanobots to the possibility of being caught up in the shock waves of a cosmic blast from an exploding supernova.
Erich Drexler's infamous "Grey Goo" hypothesis, in his 1986 book Engines of Creation, which speculates about a self-replicating nanotechnology system that is accidentally released and overruns the world.) The warhead devours most of Paris, leaving a memorable image of a half-dissolved Eiffel Tower in viewers' heads, before the good-guy soldiers save the day.
In 1986, Dr K Eric Drexler wrote Engines of Creation, popularising the idea of nanotechnology but also coining the term "grey goo" to address the possibility of nano-sized replicating robots multiplying to frightening numbers.
Drexler imagined selfreplicating nanomachines running amok, and breaking down biological material, eventually turning everything into "grey goo." Author Bill McKibben popularized this frightful idea in his book Enough: Staying Human in an Engineered World (Times Books).
It quoted Prince Charles as saying it would be "surprising" if the technology did not "offer similar upsets" to thalidomide [the morning sickness drug that caused children to be born with deformed limbs.] Apparently, some critics are referring to it as a "grey goo" of tiny particles with hidden harmful properties.
Once condemned as the stuff of nightmares - the famous grey goo that could wipe out humankind - it has now entered the business consciousness as a potential saviour of Western economies.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-20 November 2006-Second Life affected by grey goo worm(C)1994-2006 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.m2.com
Nanotechnology has been at the forefront of technological fears in recent years because people are afraid we will develop a dangerous organism that we cannot control--what nanotech pioneer Eric Drexler called "grey goo." Frankly, "grey goo" is a very long way off.