Grimes Graves


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Grimes Graves

 

Neolithic flint mines near the town of Brandon in eastern England. They have been under investigation since 1914 by A. L. Armstrong and other British archaeologists. About 250 mines have been discovered— funnel-shaped pits as much as 12–13 m deep, sometimes with steps chiseled in the chalk bed. Low galleries radiated from the steps at the level of the main stratum of flint. Spades made of deer antlers have been found as well as stone picks, hoes, and primitive lamps. Occasionally religious objects have been found: a stone female figurine and phallic symbols, among others. Petroglyphs have been preserved on the walls of the galleries. The exploitation of flint in Grimes Graves was begun in the Neolithic and continued until the early and middle Bronze Age (the third and second millennia B.C.).

REFERENCES

Clark, G. Doistoricheskaia Evropa. Moscow, 1953. (Translated from English.)
Piggott, S. The Neolithic Cultures of the British Isles. Cambridge, 1954.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Excavations at Grimes Graves Norfolk, 1972-1976: Fascicule 6; exploration and excavation beyond the deep mines.
You could visit any of 154 heritage sites from Grimes Graves - a Neolithic flint mine - to Framlingham Castle, home to Mary Tudor before she became queen.