Gringoire

Gringoire

a penniless, stupid, and oafish poet. [Fr. Lit.: The Hunchback of Notre Dame]
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, in that throng, upon which the four allegories vied with each other in pouring out floods of metaphors, there was no ear more attentive, no heart that palpitated more, not an eye was more haggard, no neck more outstretched, than the eye, the ear, the neck, and the heart of the author, of the poet, of that brave Pierre Gringoire, who had not been able to resist, a moment before, the joy of telling his name to two pretty girls.
Hardly had Gringoire raised this intoxicating cup of joy and triumph to his lips, when a drop of bitterness was mingled with it.
It made Gringoire shudder as though it had been an electric shock.
Of course," replied Gringoire, a good deal shocked by the question.
The exposition, rather long and rather empty, that is to say, according to the rules, was simple; and Gringoire, in the candid sanctuary of his own conscience, admired its clearness.
The September 15, 1893, issue of the British periodical The Review of Reviews verifies that Besant was capable of translating French; there, a lengthy article about Besant briefly touches on his English language translation of Gringoire, a play by French writer Theodore de Banville.
Por su parte, el poeta Pierre Gringoire se desentendera de la gitanilla y elegira salvar a la cabrita Djali.
In 1940, Nemirovsky's last novel about Jews, Les Chiens et les Loups, was serialized in Gringoire.
Il tient une chronique reguliere dans Gringoire et, en novembre 1935, rompt avec son parti, l'Alliance democratique qui, de son cote, prend de plus en plus nettement ses distances a l'egard des ligues, par la voix de son president, Pierre-Etienne Flandin.
An unprecedented press campaign was unleashed against him by Gringoire, a Parisian journalist.
Nemirovsky's biographers share Kershaw's view (minus her theoretical apparatus) that only a sympathetic contextual examination allows us to understand the author's more problematic choices--for example, her decision to continue publishing in Gringoire, the political and cultural weekly that had the largest circulation (and paid the highest fees to its authors) in the years before the war, but whose ideological positions became more and more anti-Semitic as the 1930s wore on.
She went on to publish novels and many short stories in Gringoire, a weekly that, Franklin says, "be came notorious during the 1930s for its harsh anti-Semitic and anti-immigrant editorials.