Griselda

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Griselda

(grĭzĕl`də), long-suffering heroine of medieval story, whose husband subjects her to numerous trials in order to test her devotion. The story originated in a widespread W European folktale patterned in part upon the story of Cupid and Psyche. The tale of Griselda was used by Boccaccio in the Decameron, by Petrarch, by Chaucer in the "Clerk's Tale," and by Thomas Dekker in the comedy Patient Grissell.

Griselda

endures husband’s cruelty nobly. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Clerk’s Tale”; Ital. Lit.: Decameron, “Dineo’s Tale of Griselda”]

Griselda

lady immortalized for patience and wifely obedience. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Clerk of Oxenford’s Tale”]
References in periodicals archive ?
The main aim of this study was to present geographical distribution and conservation information about the endemic species, Cyanopepla griseldis (Druce 1884) in Mexico in order to propose it for consideration for inclusion in the Official Mexican Norm NOM-059.
griseldis have been previously established by Hernandez-Baz (2012) considering the usage of the following 6 variables: 1) continental geographic distribution (CGD), 2) endemicity (E), 3) habitat specificity (HS), 4) persistence (P), 5) rarity (R), and 6) extractive actions (EA).
nobilis' (65) and Le Livre Griseldis has 'moult noble de
Livre Griseldis continues to refer to 'le marquis') to signify
When Griseldis seems to be about to lose her son, she hands him over while diuticule oculis inherens (274) "clinging [to him] for a short time with [her] eyes.
Ubistoire de Griseldis en France au XIVe et au XVe siecle.
Editions of Le Miroir des dames, ou la patience de Griseldis were published as late as 1660 (Limoges) and 1690 (Troyes).
The final chapter of this first part offers a brief survey of the reception of the topos in didactic works such as the tales of Philomena and Griseldis, concluding that in the latter the dynamic narrative potential of the persecuted woman whose identity as a subject is actively constructed through her suffering and exile is largely diminished because of the heroine's almost catatonic indifference towards the trials imposed on her by her husband.
Louis XIV's nostalgia for classical Antiquity exerted such a powerful influence on the French Academy that, when defending his three recently published short tales in verse in the preface to the third edition of Griseldis, nouvelle, avec le conte de Peau d'Ane et celui des Souhaits ridicules (1694) [Griselda, novel, with the Tale of Donkey Skin and that of the Ridiculous Wishes], a preface that is reprinted in the Parallele des Anciens et des Modernes (1688-1697) [Parallel of the Ancients and the Moderns], Charles Perrault felt compelled to defend the fairy tale by capitalizing on the Academy's nostalgia for the literary aesthetics of the classical past (Zarucchi 293).
Following the publication of his new vision for the literary fairy tale in the preface to Griseldis, Perrault sought to model how salon fairy tales could be made to conform to classical tastes with the circulation of his famous Contes de ma mere l'oye [Mother Goose Tales], a manuscript that was eventually published in 1697 under the title Histoires ou contes du temps passe, avec des moralites [Stories or Tales of Times Past, with Morals].
These include Die schone Magelone, Griseldis, Die Schildburger, Die vier Heymonskinder, Kaiser Octavianus, Die schone Melusina, Herzog Ernst, Doktor Faustus, and Fortunat und seine Sohne.
La plupart des heroines reelles ou legendaires--sainte Blandine, Jeanne sur son bucher, Griseldis, Genevieve de Brabant--n'atteignaient, en ce monde ou dans l'autre, la gloire et le bonheur qu'a travers de douloureuses epreuves infligees par les males.