Griselda

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Griselda

(grĭzĕl`də), long-suffering heroine of medieval story, whose husband subjects her to numerous trials in order to test her devotion. The story originated in a widespread W European folktale patterned in part upon the story of Cupid and Psyche. The tale of Griselda was used by Boccaccio in the Decameron, by Petrarch, by Chaucer in the "Clerk's Tale," and by Thomas Dekker in the comedy Patient Grissell.
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Griselda

endures husband’s cruelty nobly. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Clerk’s Tale”; Ital. Lit.: Decameron, “Dineo’s Tale of Griselda”]

Griselda

lady immortalized for patience and wifely obedience. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Clerk of Oxenford’s Tale”]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2014) on 'breeding ecology of the Basra Reed Warbler Acrocephalus griseldis (Hartlaub, 1891) in Iraq (Aves: Passeriformes: Acrocephalidae)'," Zoology in the Middle East, vol.
Burton et al., "Towards a better understanding of Basra Reed Warbler Acrocephalus griseldis (Aves: Passeriformes: Acrocephalidae) ecology?
The main aim of this study was to present geographical distribution and conservation information about the endemic species, Cyanopepla griseldis (Druce 1884) in Mexico in order to propose it for consideration for inclusion in the Official Mexican Norm NOM-059.
Griseldis has 'un marquis', and the word is glossed by the MED
When Griseldis seems to be about to lose her son, she hands him over while diuticule oculis inherens (274) "clinging [to him] for a short time with [her] eyes." The image is slightly downplayed in the anonymous French translation that Severs includes with Petrarch's Epistola: un petit longuement le regarda (275).
Nineteen drawings for the 1395 play, L'Estoire de Griseldis (Paris, Bibliotheque Nationale MS fr.
Griselda , also spelled Grisilda, also called Griseldis, Grisel, Grissil, or Patient Griselda.
The final chapter of this first part offers a brief survey of the reception of the topos in didactic works such as the tales of Philomena and Griseldis, concluding that in the latter the dynamic narrative potential of the persecuted woman whose identity as a subject is actively constructed through her suffering and exile is largely diminished because of the heroine's almost catatonic indifference towards the trials imposed on her by her husband.
These include Die schone Magelone, Griseldis, Die Schildburger, Die vier Heymonskinder, Kaiser Octavianus, Die schone Melusina, Herzog Ernst, Doktor Faustus, and Fortunat und seine Sohne.