grizzly

(redirected from Grizzly bears)
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Related to Grizzly bears: Brown bears, Polar bears

grizzly bear

a variety of the brown bear, Ursus arctos horribilis, formerly widespread in W North America; its brown fur has cream or white hair tips on the back, giving a grizzled appearance Often shortened to grizzly

grizzly

[′griz·lē]
(engineering)
A coarse screen used for rough sizing and separation of ore, gravel, or soil.
A grating to protect chutes, manways, and winzes, in mines, or to prevent debris from entering a water inlet.

grizzly

A stationary screen or series of equally spaced parallel bars set at an angle; used to remove oversize particles in processing aggregate or similar material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of those conflicts involve attacks on livestock but occasionally bears attack people, such as a Wyoming hunting guide killed earlier this month by a pair of grizzly bears.
The Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) has researched grizzly bears for decades, including recent studies that addressed the issues brought forth in the first round of lawsuits.
is one of the primary fruit resources for grizzly bears in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, where it comprises a major component of their summer and early fall diet (Munro et al.
The close and complex evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (Ursus arctos) (hereafter referred to as grizzly bears) has been investigated intensively over the past decade (Hailer et al.
The effects of open-pit mining on ungulate species like caribou have been heavily studied, but its impacts on large omnivore mammals like the grizzly bear are still largely unknown.
They had been made specifically for such a purpose, and serve as artful symbols or signatures of grizzly bears themselves.
Dax, a writer who lives in New Mexico, chronicles the failed plan to reintroduce grizzly bears to the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness of Idaho and Montana.
The Yellowstone population has slowly rebounded and now hosts the second-largest concentration of grizzly bears in the Lower 48 states.
"They can't be allowed to follow that route," grizzly bear biologist Wayne McCrory said last month of the pipeline corridor proposed for the Prince Rupert Gas Transmission Project.
The return of wolves to Yellowstone National Park--and consequent reduction of elk numbers--is proving to be beneficial for the park's grizzly bear population, according to a new study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology.
Second, it offers insight into potential foods and behaviors of grizzly bears in a range unlike any they currently occupy.