Grokster


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Related to Grokster: LimeWire

Grokster

A controversial peer-to-peer file-sharing service for music and movies that allowed users to illegally download copyrighted material onto tens of millions of computers since its founding in 2001. Almost immediately, the Grokster organization was embroiled in a copyright infringement lawsuit brought by major U.S. record companies, motion picture studios and music publishers. In November 2005, an out-of-court settlement was finally reached that immediately shut down the Grokster system and swapping software. See peer-to-peer network.

Revival Attempt
With the intention of launching a legal music service, just days after the lawsuit settled, the company's remaining assets were purchased by Mashboxx.com, run by former Grokster president, Wayne Rosso.
References in periodicals archive ?
infringement, like that in Grokster, may be the kind of control that
with reference to the Supreme Court's holdings in Sony and Grokster
(89) My analysis of Aereo's technical work-around provides a foundation for considering technological avoision as a general matter: much as Grokster and similar peer-to-peer services developed new architectures to avoid the legal definition for secondary liability, the Aereo service developed a new technical architecture in order to avoid copyright law's definition of public performance.
Many thought that Grokster would address the same issue--whether file-sharing networks had substantial non-infringing uses, such as sharing files that were not subject to copyright or for which the copyright owner had granted permission.
Unlike in Sony, the Court in Grokster made no effort to argue that
liable, the Supreme Court pronounced that Sony and Grokster could be
369, 398 (2006) ("[T]he doctrines of contributory infringement and inducement of infringement are stronger than ever, having been extended by the Supreme Court to cover copyright infringement through the use of VCR's and file sharing on the Internet."); Mark Bartholomew, Copyright, Trademark and Secondary Liability After Grokster, 32 COLUM.
The high court ruled against file-sharing company Grokster in 2005, but warnings that legal uncertainty would stifle future innovation don't seem to have stopped the march of technology into new and varied formats for listening to music and watching movies.
(17) The music industry pursued lawsuits against each of the new peer-to-peer services that popped up, including Kazaa, Morpheus, Grokster, Aimster, LimeWire, and MegaUpload.
(43) Like in Grokster, the defendants were aware that a large number of their users were engaged in the unlawful distribution of copyrighted material, (44) and the court found that the actions of the website aided and abetted the principal offences of copyright infringement under Swedish law.
The content industries filed infringement suits against companies such as Napster and Grokster that enabled users to share files of copyrighted materials.