Ground glass

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Related to Ground-glass: ground glass appearance

ground glass

[¦grau̇nd ′glas]
(optics)
A sheet of matte-surfaced glass on the back of a view camera or process camera so that the image of the subject can be focused on it; it is exactly in the film plane.

Ground glass

Glass whose surface has been roughened with an abrasive, diffusing the light passing through it; produced by sand blasting or etching with acid.

ground glass

Glass having a surface that has been roughened, usually by sandblasting or by acid, to make it nontransparent.
References in periodicals archive ?
10 found that there was a significant difference in the percentages of ground-glass opacity between moderate differentiation, HD and LD groups (P<0.
Correlation between the size of the solid component on thin-section CTand the invasive component on pathology in small lung adenocarcinomas manifesting as ground-glass nodules.
Rather than the dense consolidation manifest in the "Swiss Cheese" appearance, Sponge Lung is characterized predominantly by interlobular septal thickening and ground-glass opacity.
Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the ground-glass appearance, and revealed the horizontal expansion of the crest in the premolar -molar area (Figure 2).
Nodular ground-glass opacity at thin-section CT: histologic correlation and evaluation of change at follow-up.
5 mm ground-glass opacity nodule in left upper lobe of lung (arrow) and a 16 mm part-solid ground-glass nodule in left lower lobe of lung (arrowhead).
Radiographically, he developed diffuse, centrilobular ground-glass nodules and small pleural effusions 25 months after transplant (Figure 1).
Conclusion: The most common pattern was found to be patchy areas of ground-glass attenuation.
Table 1: Age Distribution of Patients Age Number of Patients 15-30 Yrs 5 31-45 Yrs 9 >46 Yrs 6 Table 2: Sex Distribution of Patients Sex Number Male 8 Female 12 Table 3: Occupation House wife 11 Businessmen 3 Politician 1 Security guard 1 Farmer 1 Daily wage labor 3 Table 4: Chest X-Ray Patterns Reticulo-nodular 7/20 Micronodular 5/20 Macronodular 1/20 Ground-glass 4/20 Consolidation 3/20 Table 5: HRCT Chest-Predominant Patterns Reticular 4/20 Ground-glass 5/20 Air-space consolidation 5/20 Nodular pattern 4/20 Honey combing/ traction 2/20 bronchiectasis / cystic changes Table 6: Bronchoscopic Biopsy Findings Interstitial Fibrosis 4 Chr.
2) The halo sign refers to a zone of ground-glass attenuation surrounding the circumference of a pulmonary nodule or mass on CT images.
Thoracal HRCT revealed ground-glass appearance in all lobes and segments in both lungs and extensive centrilobular millimetric nodularities, regionally increased aeration especially in the lower lobes and f ibrotic changes in the anterobasal segment of the lower lobe in the right lung (Picture 2).
UIP and NSIP patterns on HRCT scan (1-3) UIP NSIP Bilateral reticular opacities Bilateral reticular opacities Ground-glass opacities not Bilateral ground-glass prominent opacities Basal and subpleural Basal predominance, diffuse or predominance subpleural Fibrosis and honeycombing Honeycombing minimal or absent With or without traction With or without traction bronchiectasis bronchiectasis UIP = usual interstitial pneumonia; NSIP = nonspecific interstitial pneumonia; HRCT = high-resolution computerised tomography.