Group Method of Work by Agricultural Aggregates

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Group Method of Work by Agricultural Aggregates

 

the performance of an agricultural process by several identical aggregates at once.

The group method was first used in harvesting grain crops, and later in virtually all agricultural field work. There are two variations of the group method: (1) The aggregates work in one field, but each of them works a different strip (used in plowing, sowing, and other jobs where quality control is required). (2) The aggregates work in a single strip, moving one behind the other (used most often in harvest work and where there is a shortage of transportation). In the first case the quality of work of each aggregate can be controlled, and in the second case the means of transportation can be used more efficiently than otherwise. With the group method the productivity of aggregates increases and each field can be worked in a shorter time while continuing to observe the requirements of scientific farming; this promotes an increase in the crop yield, a reduction of losses, improved engineering service of the aggregates, and a decrease in downtime because of malfunctions and organizational factors. The group method of work by aggregates during the harvest makes it possible to carry out the entire cycle of agricultural operations without gaps in time by employing the flow method of work organization. To achieve greater effectiveness when introducing the group method, the times and order of working the fields should be properly outlined, with due regard for the condition of the plants, the weediness of the fields, soil moisture, and other agrotechnical factors. In addition, the size of the fields and the distances between them, the shift capacity of the aggregate, and the number of aggregates in the group must be taken into account in order to reduce the time and fuel spent on empty runs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.