Grout


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grout

[grau̇t]
(materials)
A fluid mixture of cement and water, or a mixture of cement, sand, and water.
Waste material of all sizes obtained in quarrying stone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Grout

Mortar containing a considerable amount of water so that it has the consistency of a viscous liquid, permitting it to be poured or pumped into joints, spaces, and cracks within masonry walls and floors.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

Grout

A binding or structural agent used in construction and engineering applications. Grout is typically a mixture of hydraulic cement and water, with or without fine aggregate; however, chemical grouts are also produced. See Cement

The type most commonly specified in construction and engineering is cementitious grout, which is used where its more conventional sister material, concrete, is less suited because of placing limitations or restrictions on coarse-aggregate contents. Cementitious grouts are used to fill voids and cracks in pavements, building and dam foundations, and brick and concrete masonry wall assemblies; to construct floor toppings or provide flooring underlayment; to place ceramic tile; and to bind preplaced-aggregate concrete. See Concrete

Grout can be formulated from a variety of cements and minerals and proportioned for specific applications. Neat cement grout refers to formulations without aggregate, containing only hydraulic cement, water, and possibly admixtures. Sanded grout is any mix containing fine aggregate and it is formulated much like masonry mortar. Whether neat or sanded, cementitious grouts derive their strength and other properties from the same calcium silicate-based binding chemistry as concrete.

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

grout

1. Mortar containing a considerable amount of water so that it has the consistency of a viscous liquid, permitting it to be poured or pumped into joints, spaces, and cracks within masonry walls and floors, between pieces of ceramic clay, slate, and floor tile, and into the joints between preformed roof deck units.
2. In foundation work, mixtures of cement, cement-sand, clay, or chemicals; used to fill voids in granular soils, usually by a process of successive injection through drilled holes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[21, 22], mathematical calculation process and curves for each growth rate of these four parameters and rock mass rating (RMR) are presented in Sections 3-7, with the UCS of grout concretion into account.
Aligning the excellent properties of the new offshore grout with the operational advantages of FoundOcean's continuous mixing and pumping equipment will bring major health and safety improvements and installation cost reductions," said Luc Westhof, global key account manager at BASF's Construction Chemicals division.
The investigations of base and shaft grouted uplift field tests, capacity improvement, and load transfer mechanism, however, remain limited.
Kawasaki, "Novel grout material comprised of calcium phosphate compounds: in vitro evaluation of crystal precipitation and strength reinforcement," Engineering Geology, vol.
John Clements, via email ABLACK tiles and grout are the worst colour to have when you're getting efflorescence of salts from the cement and bricks.
"To date, the only proven method of stopping infiltration is the application of chemical grout," said Dr.
CH2M-Hill investigated several different rehab technologies and selected chemical grout to stop the leaks.
The high-pressure pumping of grout eliminates the need for utilizing a plug at a collar.
[ClickPress, Wed Apr 25 2018] Already proven in use for the major Humber Gateway OWF and Culzean Offshore projects 100 Newton Grout AW supplied in bulk tanker format has been accredited to the standard DNV-OS-C502 "Offshore Concrete Structures".
A two-component (resin component A and catalyst component B) epoxy resin grout and a chemical additive were prepared with a ratio of 1.5:1.
The non-shrink, non-metallic construction grout features controlled expansion, meets ASTM standards C 1107 and CRD-C621, and can be specified for high tolerance placements that require maximum load bearing capacity.
A total of 616 [m.sup.3] of cement based grout was pumped during a three-weeks period.