growth cone

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growth cone

[′grōth ‚kōn]
(neuroscience)
A specialized structure at the end of a growing nerve fiber that guides the fiber to its destination during the development of the nervous system by means of interaction with signaling molecules in its surroundings and its own motile mechanism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Time-lapse movies indicate that these mutants fail to form stable growth cones, which is a required first step for successful axon regeneration.
As a circuit is being built, RNAs in the neuron's growth cones are mostly silent.
These phases of neuromuscular synapse formation are known to involve the elevation of resting calcium, voltage-activated calcium influx, and neurotransmitter release following contact of growth cones with muscle targets (Zoran et al, 1993; Funte and Haydon, 1993; Zoran and Poyer, 1996).
Actions of cytochalasins on the organization of actin filaments and microtubules in a neuronal growth cone.
Extremely complex and highly developed growth cones were observed from both E9.
When the factors in CM are presented as a concentration gradient to growth cones of adult frog and rat sensory and motor neurons in vivo, the growth cones "read" the direction of the concentration gradient of factors.
The growth cones of the pioneering axons are larger and more complex than the subsequent growth cones, signifying the complex environmental cues they must sort through (Bak & Fraser, 2003).
It also marks the first time aggregate growth cones were used in FOMC policy deliberations.
Furthermore, the expanded aggregate has stayed near the middle of the growth cones implied by the Federal Reserve's M2 target growth ranges.
The presence of two unique membrane-associated phosphoproteins in growth cones is interesting in light of studies linking intracellular calcium ion and other second messengers to growth cone behaviour involved in synaptic remodelling in adult neurons.
In contrast, damaged central-nervous-system neurons usually form nonregenerating swellings called retraction bulbs at the tip of their axonal stumps--essentially the non-growing equivalent of growth cones.
In the present study we have experimented with changing this lamellipodial-based flow pattern into one that resembles the filopodial-dominated pattern present in neuronal growth cones.