Guadalquivir


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Guadalquivir

(gwä'thälkēvēr`), river, c.350 mi (560 km) long, rising in the Sierra de Cazorla, SE Spain, and flowing generally SW past Córdoba and Seville into the Atlantic Ocean near Sanlúcar de Barrameda. Known to the Arabs as Wadi al-Kebir [the large river], it is the longest stream in the Andalusia region of S Spain. There are several hydroelectric plants along its course. In its middle course it flows through a populous fertile region at the foot of the Sierra Morena, where it is used extensively for irrigation. The area has a rich variety of plant life. The lower course of the Guadalquivir traverses extensive marshlands (Las Marismas) that are used for rice cultivation. The river is tidal to Seville (c.50 mi/80 km upstream), a major inland port and head of navigation for oceangoing vessels, and it is canalized between Seville and the sea.

Guadalquivir

 

a river in southern Spain. Length, 560 km; basin area, 57,000 sq km. The Guadalquivir originates in the northern part of the Andalusian Mountains, and its valley widens in the Andalusian Lowland; the width of the riverbed between the cities of Córdoba and Seville is 150-200 m. Below Seville the Guadalquivir flows along a flat coastal lowland and divides into branches. Before emptying into the Gulf of Cádiz on the Atlantic Ocean, the river regathers its waters into a single riverbed, then forms an estuary reaching 7 km in width. Its principal tributaries are the Guadiana Menor and Genii on the left and the Guadalimar and Rio de Huelva on the right. It is fed primarily by rain and reaches its water level in February and March. The average flow rate is 164 cu m per sec. It is navigable up to the city of Córdoba and as far as Seville for maritime vessels (at high tides). The Guadalquivir is used for irrigation.

Guadalquivir

the chief river of S Spain, rising in the Sierra de Segura and flowing west and southwest to the Gulf of C?diz: navigable by ocean-going vessels to Seville. Length: 560 km (348 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
In this instance, it is not the Guadalquivir which is idealized but rather the Manzanares.
That temblor, with smaller ones along the Guadalquivir Ridge and Gorringe Bank faults, could account for the size of the Lisbon quakes on the disastrous day in 1755, as well as the heights and arrival times of the tsunamis the quakes triggered, says Baptista.
Moneo's proposal locates the congress centre on the eastern edge of the peninsula, its long rectangular form emulating and engaging in dialogue with the Mezquita, on the opposite bank of the Guadalquivir. The building is enclosed by imperforate walls, a favourite device of Moneo's that reinterprets the traditional form of the Spanish alcazar.
Grandson of Hisham, the 10th Umayyad Caliph; escaped the Abbasid massacre of the Umayyads and fled to North Africa (750); built up his forces and invaded Abbasid Spain (755); defeated the army of Caid Yusuf of Cordoba at the battle of the Guadalquivir River (756); campaigned steadily against the Muslims of Spain, gradually subduing them and bringing them under Umayyad control (756-764); repulsed Charlemagne's invasion of northern Spain at Saragossa (Zaragoza) (778), and closely pursued his rearguard at the pass of Roncesvalles (778); died in 788.