Guaiacum


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Related to Guaiacum: Guaiacum sanctum

Guaiacum

 

a genus of evergreen trees of the bean-caper family (Zygophyllaceae). There are six species in tropical America. The trees are tall, with paripinnate leaves, and hard, heavy wood (density, 1.17-1.3 g/cm3), which is used in machine building. The most valuable timber for industrial purposes comes from G. sanctum and G. officinale. (Guaiacum is obtained from the latter.)


Guaiacum

 

contained in the wood (about 22 percent) of the heart of the guaiac tree (lignum vitae; Guaiacum officinale). Guaiacum is obtained by the dry distillation or boiling of the pounded wood. The gum is reddish brown, dissolves in alcohol, acetone, ether, and alkali, and melts at 85° C. It has a density of 1.2 g/cm3. An alcohol solution of guaiacum turns green or blue when oxidized and is used as a hemoglobin reagent.

References in periodicals archive ?
Metodologia: Las especies seleccionadas para este estudio fueron Canella winterana, Croton discolor, Goetzea elegans, Guaiacum officinale, Pimenta racemosa, Simarouba tulae y Thouinia striata.
Proportion Species Common name Number (%) Acacia rigidula Blackbrush 51 28.3 Acacia berlandieri Guajillo 33 18.3 Opuntia leptocaulis Tasajillo 33 18.3 Opuntia engelmannii Prickly pear cactus 12 6.7 Guaiacum angustifolium Guayacan 12 6.7 Echinocereus enneacanthus Strawberry cactus 5 2.8 Jatropha dioica Leather stem 5 2.8 Prosopis glandulosa Honey mesquite 2 1.1 Other vegetation 27 15.0 Total 180 Density Species (#/ha) Acacia rigidula 1275 Acacia berlandieri 825 Opuntia leptocaulis 825 Opuntia engelmannii 300 Guaiacum angustifolium 300 Echinocereus enneacanthus 125 Jatropha dioica 125 Prosopis glandulosa 50 675 4500 Table 2.--Planned comparisons among microhabitat classes of the contingency table for microhabitat vs.
1525), along with his medical text on relieving the morbus gallicus with guaiacum wood, El modo de adoperare el legno de India, published in 1529 (485).
These include mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), cedar (Cedrela odorata), aceituna (Quassia simarouba [=Simarouba glauca]), ziricote (Cordia dodecandra) and guacayan or lignum-vitae (Guaiacum sanctum).
Thus there was a relatively high incidence of well-to-do patients among the hospital's clientele in the years when guaiacum (or Holy Wood, widely regarded as a panacea for mal francese) was administered.
Treatments with the dry stove or stufa sicca, especially with the introduction of guaiacum and mercury, are also described along with the diet of the patients.
A tree typically foraged upon by white-tailed deer and cattle, the seemingly unobtrusive guayacan (Guaiacum angustifolium), has a root system that plant ecologists speculate may endure for about 1,000 years.
And how could learned medicine account for the fact that two of the most popular remedies, guaiacum wood imported from the New World and mercury salves, originated among unschooled empirics?
It may be used with black cohosh, celery seed, guaiacum, and bogbean in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
Delicate, hyaline wings characterize fruits of some Nyctaginaceae, Polygonaceae, and Asteraceae (e.g., Tripteris), while thick, nearly opaque wings are found in Cliftonia, Gouania, Guaiacum, Nothofagus, and Oenothera.