Guide Star Catalog


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Guide Star Catalog

A catalog of celestial objects, mainly stars, compiled at the Space Telescope Science Institute during the early 1980s. It served as the database for the sensitive guidance system of the Hubble Space Telescope. In its earliest published form, Version 1.2, it contained the positions of about 19 million objects, including some of the 16th magnitude. It was superseded by Version 2.2, which contained the positions for 435 million celestial objects down to the 19th magnitude. The Guide Star Catalog was compiled from the analysis of photographic plates and contains no proper motions. It is available on CD-ROM.
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0 and differential ensemble photometry based on 10 nearby comparison stars with V magnitudes derived from the Guide Star Catalog.
the leader in high performance database engines that manage complex data, real-time applications and very large volumes of data, today announced that the Catalogs and Surveys Branch of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) has been using Objectivity/DB for its four terabyte Guide Star Catalog (GSC).
The main package comes with a subset of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Catalog with stars down to about magnitude 8 but there are also options to use the full SAO, the Hubble Guide Star Catalog (GSC), and the complete Hipparcos, Tycho, Tycho-2, and US Naval Observatory UCAC2 databases.
COMPASS (Catalogs of Objects and Measured Parameters from All Sky Surveys) is a database for the production and distribution of the second-generation Guide Star Catalog (GSC-II).
0 coordinates, and the 18 million stars from the Hubble Guide Star Catalog.
50) now accesses the Hubble Guide Star Catalog 2 and the USNO A2.
The program incorporates the Hipparcos and Tycho star catalogs, as well as the larger Hubble Guide Star Catalog, and allows the user to manipulate the data in interesting ways.
In addition, Sky Simulator does not support faint-star catalogs such as the Hubble Guide Star Catalog and the USNO A2.
In these days of the Hubble Guide Star Catalog, the use of the Bright Star Catalog might sound restrictive, but the latter provides valuable background information about each entry, and the choice is a sensible one in view of the target audience for the software.
WHEN THE HUBBLE GUIDE Star Catalog (GSC) was introduced in 1989 it was widely hailed as the best star catalog of its day.
Compared to current PC programs, Star Pilot's offering seems unimpressive: it has no way to access the Hubble Guide Star Catalog, no high-resolution imagery, and no way to control a telescope.
I create these charts using Guide 7, one of the charting programs that draws on the Hubble Guide Star Catalog with stars to about magnitude 14.