Guillaume de Lorris


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Lorris, Guillaume de:

see Guillaume de LorrisGuillaume de Lorris
, c.1215–c.1278, French poet, author of the first part of the Roman de la Rose. He handled the chivalric conventions with subtlety and charm, and his work shows taste, psychological perception, and wide familiarity with French letters.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Guillaume de Lorris

(gēyōm` də lôrēs`), c.1215–c.1278, French poet, author of the first part of the Roman de la RoseRoman de la Rose, Le
, French poem of 22,000 lines in eight-syllable couplets. It is in two parts. The first (4,058 lines) was written (c.1237) by Guillaume de Lorris and was left unfinished. It is an elaborate allegory on the psychology of love, often subtle and charming.
..... Click the link for more information.
. He handled the chivalric conventions with subtlety and charm, and his work shows taste, psychological perception, and wide familiarity with French letters.

Guillaume de Lorris

13th century, French poet who wrote the first 4058 lines of the allegorical romance, the Roman de la rose, continued by Jean de Meung
References in periodicals archive ?
Literature, in the tradition of courtly love, includes such works as Lancelot by Chretien de Troyes, Tristan and Isolt by Gottfried von Strassbourg, Le Roman de la Rose by Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meung, and the Arthurian romances.
My final text is Guillaume de Lorris's Roman de la rose.
The naming of Amans as John Gower matches the naming of L'Amant as Guillaume de Lorris: in both poems, this is the first time the Lover has been identified.
Le Roman de la Rose de Guillaume de Lorris. Geneva: Slatkine, 1983.
He devours Jean as Jean had devoured Guillaume de Lorris. The ideas and the texts will live on in a new life' (p.
The document twice was translated into French during the 13th century; Guillaume de Lorris drew upon it for the Roman de la Rose.
The first four thousand lines were written by Guillaume de Lorris about 1230 and form an allegory of the Art of Love modeled on Ovid ' s.
(162-63) The implication of the God of Love's explanation is, as Heller-Roazen states, that "the 'I' of the text must be, and yet cannot be, referred to Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun" (52).
A likely precursor to Guillaume de Lorris's Roman de la Rose, this unfinished, 1721-line text has an important place in the tradition of allegorical literature, and has numerous points of contact with amatory treatises such as Ovid's Ars amatoria and Andreas Capellanus's De amore.
Petrarch poetized that it flashed like lightning.(71) Its inspiration was reminiscent of the cherubim, a meteorological storm envisioned by Ezekiel, the prophet whose vocation the poet imitated.(72) In Guillaume de Lorris's Roman de la rose the eyes and the lips even competed for priority in laughter.(73) Ficino expressed a preference for the ocular manifestation of laughter,(74) describing the eyes as the "most celestial" feature of the face.