Guitry


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Guitry

Sacha . 1885--1957, French actor, dramatist, and film director, born in Russia: plays include Nono (1905)
References in periodicals archive ?
She befriends the city's artists, from Pablo Picasso and Salvador DalA- to Edith Piaf and Sacha Guitry, and experiences all of Paris's human pleasures: drinking, partying, and having sex with wild abandon.
She also mentions several figures from French drama who are no longer generally familiar: George Wague (1874-1965), a famous mime Colette performed with, notably in the play La Chair [Flesh]-, Christine Kerf (1875-1963), an actress who also appeared frequently with Colette; Sacha Guitry (1885-1957), an actor, director, playwright and screenwriter who wrote more than 120 plays; the Tarride family, which boasted several actors, including Abel (1865-1951), Jean (1901-1980) and Jacques (1903-1994); Firmin Gernier (1869-1933), a famous actor and director who created the title role in Alfred Jarry's play Uhu Roi; Marguerite Moreno (1871-1948), a renowned actress and close friend of Colette's; and the Fratellini, a circus family with exaggerated makeup.
Researchers also claimed French stars such as Edith Piaf, Maurice Chevalier and Sacha Guitry had links with Nazis.
I was also very critical of "French quality films" in many of my texts, as in "A bas Clair, vive Guitry." But the context was favorable for such things, with the polemical influence of Truffaut and the solidarity we felt toward him.
La primera vez sucedio en octubre de 1931, para la obra Faisons un reve de Sacha Guitry; el recurso a Mussolini se repitio muchas veces en la etapa inicial de su actividad.
First staged in 2013, "PSY" is an adaptation of the French comic play "Une Folie" by dramatist Sasha Guitry. It proved so popular that Ghosn decided to rework his original adaptation, expanding the plot and the cast of characters to make it a more labyrinthine thing.
(here we are with hair again)" in Sacha Guitry's Si Versailles m'etait conte (1953)--is only the starting point of a complex hermeneutical construction where the hair motif will reappear as an obsessive fil rouge.
A chapter on Sacha Guitry shows how this eccentric French director remains "the only true cineaste" of Versailles, a palace that "is simultaneously time, a body, and a language--that is, a representative of French history" (100).
The last item in the exhibition is a poignant paparazzi-style shot of a white-bearded Degas shot by director Sacha Guitry.