Gujars

Gujars

 

divergent groups of a once large family-tribal union, settled mainly in the western part of the Himalayan foothills in India and Pakistan and numbering about 1.2 million (1970, estimate). They speak several related dialects of western Pahari, which belongs to the group of Indie (Indo-Aryan) language family. Almost all Gujars are Sunnite Muslims. Their basic occupation is seminomadic cattle raising. The Gujars supply milk products to local markets. Some of their ancestors constituted the ethnic base of the Gujaratis; others settled along the plains of Rajasthan and the central Ganges, lost their language, and became the agricultural caste called Gujars.

REFERENCE

Narody luzhnoi Azii. Moscow, 1963.
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In results the cusp of Carabelli exhibited maximum expression in Swati group while in Swati and Gujars more shoveling was observed as compared to Jadoons however the Bushmen canine was totally absent in these groups.
The ethnic groups selected for this study were Gujars, Jadoon and Swati.
The comparison between frequency of morphological variations among Swati, Jadoons and Gujars ethnic groups (Table 1and2) showed that all three populations have high percentage of cusp of Carabelli followed by shoveling and distal accessory ridge trait while Bushmen canine was absent in all three ethnic groups.
In Jadoons population the trait most frequently examined was again cusp of Carabelli similar to Swatis and Gujars which was 72% on right side first molar and 69% on left side molar (Table 2).
Within the limitations of this study, Gujars, Swatis and Jadoons population all exhibited dental morphological variations except Bushmen canine.
The aim of the study was to elucidate the prevalence of some accessory dental morphological traits variations in permanent teeth of population belonging to Swati, Gujar and Jadoon ethnic groups.
Gujars are the people found all over Northern India.
Van Gujars are the pastoral nomads who inherently are Sunni Muslims who inhabit the foothills of Shivalik ecosystem which, lies between the Himalaya and the Upper Gangetic plains.
At the bottom of the 'raos' close to the forest edge and the road lie the villages of the settled populations while their extensions into the interiors of the Shivaliks mark the territories of the Van Gujars.
The Gujars from Jammu and Kashmir migrated to the neighboring northern states of Himachal Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh.
The Deras are normally temporary in nature in the sense that the Deras get dismantled by the forest officials while Gujars make upward movement and Van Gujars construct it once again upon returning back to the Shivaliks after their summer stay at Alpines.
A civil engineer from a Gujar family in Delhi, Khari offers an account of the origins, history, and characteristics of the two warrior peoples of India.