Guri Dam


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Guri Dam,

24,364 ft (7,426 m) long and 531 ft (162 m) high, on the Caroní River, Bolívar state, SW Venezuela. Built in phases between 1963 and 1986, the dam consists of a central concrete gravity dam with earthen embankment dams on both sides. It impounds the 1,640-sq-mi (4,250-sq-km) Guri Reservoir, with a capacity of more than 110 million acre-ft (135 billion cu m). The Símon Bólivar power station immediately below the dam generates more than 10,000 MW and supplies some 70% of the country's electricity. It is the second largest hydroelectric plant in South America, exceeded only by that at the Itaipú DamItaipú Dam
, hydroelectric dam on the Paraná River, on the Brazil-Paraguay border. Jointly constructed (1975–91) by Brazil and Paraguay, it is the second-largest hydroelectric dam in the world, exceeded only by the Three Gorges Dam. The dam is 4.8 mi (7.
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The alleged attacks on power lines and the Guri Dam hydroelectric plant's transformers plunged most of the country into darkness, disrupting supplies of food, clean water, fuel and medicine, RIA Novosti reported.
The government of President Nicolas Maduro sought to blame U.S.-backed opponents, accusing them of sabotaging the Guri dam, source of the bulk of Venezuela's electricity.
Last week, 22 out of 23 states in Venezuela experienced a total blackout when the Guri dam was "sabotaged", according to national electricity supplier Corpoelec.
Government officials on Thursday said the massive Guri dam was damaged by a cyber attack, and initially said power would return within three hours.
The environmental impacts of the mining activities in the region are severe, and the toll of the Guri dam, which supplies power for nearby mining operations, is terrible.
Maduro's government had rationed electricity in the provinces, cut the work week for public employees to two days per week, and canceled school on Fridays to save power as the country's massive Guri dam dried up.
The country is facing a major drought which has reduced the water level at El Guri dam - Venezuela's main dam and hydroelectric plant, which provides for about two-thirds of its energy needs - to near-critical levels.
A side effect has been decreased water flow (and thus reduced capacity) to the massive Guri Dam, a 10,200-megawatt behemoth that supplies more than 70% of the country's electricity.
The government says rationing is necessary to prevent a widespread power collapse if the water levels behind Guri Dam -- which supplies most of Venezuela's electricity -- fall to critical lows in the coming months due to a severe drought.
The government says rationing is necessary to prevent a widespread power collapse if the water levels behind Guri Dam - which supplies most of Venezuela's electricity - fall to critical lows in the coming months due to a severe drought.
The Guri dam complex, built with post-war oil riches in the 1960s, ranks as one of the world's largest hydro-electric projects.