Gurkhas


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Gurkhas

 

the conventional name of the peoples inhabiting the central and southwestern regions of Nepal.

The Gurkhas include descendants of the peoples who began coming to the area from Rajasthan in India in the 13th century, such as the Khasi, as well as the indigenous peoples of Nepal, such as the Magars, Gurungs, Tamangs, Sunwars, and Rais (Kirats), who, together with the newcomers, formed a military confederation in the 18th century headed by the ruler of the principality of Gorkha (hence the name), Prithvi Narayan, who brought all of Nepal under his rule. The language of the newcomers, Nepali, became the official language of the country, and the Gurkhas call themselves Nepali. The estimated number of Gurkhas in 1970 was more than 5 million. For the most part their religion is Hinduism. They are divided into castes. Their main occupations are irrigated and dry farming (rice, wheat, barley, corn, and vegetables), cattle and goat herding, and trades, such as weaving and smithcraft. Migration to India for seasonal work is common.

REFERENCES

Narody Iuzhnoi Azii. Moscow, 1963. (Bibliography.)
Guseva, N. R. “Naselenie Nepala. Sovetskaia etnografiia, no. 5, 1958.
Sovremennyi Nepal. Moscow, 1967.

Gurkhas

Nepalese mercenaries, renowned for valor. [Nepalese Hist.: NCE, 1165]
References in periodicals archive ?
So far, 88 ex-Gurkhas have done similar work with the Gurkha Welfare Trust in 1,750 villages.
Since then, over 200,000 Gurkhas have fought on behalf of the British in both world wars while many, in the past 50 years alone, have served in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Borneo, Cyprus, the Falklands, Kosovo and, most recently, Iraq and Afghanistan.
Actress and Gurkha campaigner Joanna Lumley was among the guests.
PRINCESS Anne came to the Midlands to mark the bravery of Gurkha soldiers.
In the senior league, there are two unbeaten teams - Gurkhas in first place and British Knights third.
Major Rob Cross from the West Midlands branch said: "This is a rare opportunity to hear the renowned Band of the Brigade of Gurkhas, who only come to the Midlands once a year, and support brave Gurkhas who have served their country.
The soldiers, from the 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, were shot dead at a checkpoint in Nahr-e Saraj, Helmand Province.
Writing in The People today, former Shadow Homeland Security minister and retired colonel Patrick Mercer says: "Everyone admires the Gurkhas but why in difficult financial times should British jobs be filled by Nepalis?
The Rushmoor Borough Council comprises about 10 percent of Nepalese population, following the 2009 legal ruling, which allowed Gurkha soldiers who had retired before 1997, to settle in the area.
The Gurkhas simply couldn't comprehend the problem.
For 200 years the Gurkhas have helped to fight our wars.
The first tranche of up to 165 Gurkhas will be announced in September," a statement from the British embassy said.