Gurney-Mott theory

Gurney-Mott theory

[′gər·nē ′mät ‚thē·ə·rē]
(chemistry)
A theory of the photographic process that proposes a two-stage mechanism; in the first stage, a light quantum is absorbed at a point within the silver halide gelatin, releasing a mobile electron and a positive hole; these mobile defects diffuse to trapping sites (sensitivity centers) within the volume or on the surface of the grain; in the second stage, trapped (negatively charged) electron is neutralized by an interstitial (positively charged) silver ion, which combines with the electron to form a silver atom; the silver atom is capable of trapping a second electron, after which the process repeats itself, causing the silver speck to grow.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, many radiologic technology schools teach sensitometry in the same vein as the Gurney-Mott theory of the formation of the latent image: "You need to know about it, but you don't need to use it." This gives students the impression that the only people who can understand sensitometry or need to use it are QC technologists.