Gusle


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gusle

 

(Serbo-Croatian and Slovenian), gusla (Bulgarian), a folk instrument of the South Slavs played with a bow. It has a hollow, oval or pear-shaped wooden body with a leather diaphragm stretched over the open side and one or two horsehair strings. The player only touches the strings lightly and does not press them to the finger-board. The instrument is used mainly to accompany singing.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Flipping the gusle over told a very different story, and made immediately clear why this ravaged instrument belongs in the archive.
These inscriptions alone make this gusle extremely compelling as a cultural object--but it goes further.
We have a chance to be a serious band, serious musicians, and he wants me to find him a gusle.
(22) "Vidio si kako je pri sluzbi crkva dupkom puna narodna, da ni na vrata doci ne mozes,--niti oko crkve proci, jer je svu portu bogomoljni narod pritisnuo....Vidio si kako je ovde i onde kakvog slepca, koji uz gusle koju narodnu pesmu peva, opkolila gomila slusaoca obojeg pola, starih i mladih, pa peva li se junacestvo kakvog srpskog junaka, to ce[section] primetiti izrazeni ponos na lieu slusaoca.
and I pick up the gusle [the accompanying instrument]--"Mustajbey of
A gusle is a simple fiddle with one string made of a strand of horsehair, often used in accompanying epic or narrative songs.
guslarplural guslariSerbo-Croatian guslar, a derivative of gusle single-stringed fiddle
Kikinda: Drustvo za negovanje muzike "Gusle," 2001.47 p.
At first, and for a long time, it was delivered orally by singers accompanying their recitation by a one-string instrument called gusle. In 1814 Vuk Karadzic collected those songs in a book Pesnarica (song book) which has since then remained a standard collection of Serbian folk poetry, although there have been many other collections in the 19th century.
It is particularly puzzling that all three epics are accompanied by a rather untypical instrument, the tambura, rather than the usual gusle. Even disregarding the scarcity of epics accompanied by the tambura, epics sung with the gusle would have been a better choice for a study of the genre's musical aspects.
and the gusle under the earth is fertile with memories.