Guy of Warwick


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Guy of Warwick

(wŏr`ĭk), English legendary hero, popularized by an anonymous 14th-century rhymed romance. Guy won the earl of Warwick's daughter and saved England from the Danes by killing the giant Colbrand; he later renounced worldly vanities and ended his days as a hermit. The story probably has a historical basis. Its popularity lasted through the 17th and 18th cent.
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References in classic literature ?
I should like to tell you of Guy of Warwick, of King Horn, of William and the Werewolf, and of many others.
Everyone loves the mythical tale of an ancient legend - Robin Hood, King Arthur - and in this gripping night show at Warwick Castle you get to hear about a not so well known legend, Guy of Warwick.
Plus, the children went to Knight's school, ran around the gardens and helped break the curse of a sorcerer who had imprisoned Guy of Warwick in a painting.
Much like Felice, wife of Guy of Warwick, who leaped to her death from the crest of the cliff where the old house now stands, and has haunted the place ever since.
Despite the best efforts of heroic Sir Guy of Warwick - and he did defeat the beast, after all - the castle was left in ruins.
Dragon Slayer resurrects the tale of the 10th century warrior and homegrown hero Guy of Warwick.
Showcasing the epic journey of Guy of Warwick as he battles beasts to win the heart of Princess Felice, the Earl of Warwick's daughter, Dragon Slayer is the first night-time spectacular created exclusively by the castle.
Warwick Castle flew the flag of legendary knight Guy of Warwick. And unlike England's patron saint - believed to be a third century Roman Christian - Guy was English to the core.
BIG KNIGHT FOR THE DRAGON THIS summer will see legendary dragon slayer, Guy of Warwick, feel the heat as he battles fiery beasts in a new extravaganza held at Warwick Castle.
26) observable in the prologues of the major texts (this, Spence argues, represents a shift from an earlier authorial standpoint of humility in similar situations); the representation of 'English' heroes (Havelock, Guy of Warwick, and others) whose stories are grafted on to the 'British' content in order to create a new sense of national origins; and retellings of the Norman Conquest.
Guy of Warwick loomed large in medieval lore and literature--he shares entry in Great Britain's Dictionary of National Biography with only two other legendary figures, King Arthur and Robin Hood--esteemed for both his prowess as an invincible warrior and his piety, in later years, as a pilgrim and hermit.
Robert Rouse uses Guy of Warwick as exemplary illustration of a shift in the geography of romance in "Walking (between) the Lines: Romance as Itinerary/Map," a geography seen first in Guy as an itinerary of chivalric maturation, then one of spiritual pilgrimage, but also to be seen anew as a mapping of mercantile space.