Guy of Warwick


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Guy of Warwick

(wŏr`ĭk), English legendary hero, popularized by an anonymous 14th-century rhymed romance. Guy won the earl of Warwick's daughter and saved England from the Danes by killing the giant Colbrand; he later renounced worldly vanities and ended his days as a hermit. The story probably has a historical basis. Its popularity lasted through the 17th and 18th cent.
References in classic literature ?
I should like to tell you of Guy of Warwick, of King Horn, of William and the Werewolf, and of many others.
Plus, we attended a Royal party in private apartments and helped break the curse of a sorcerer who had imprisoned Guy of Warwick in a painting.
The earliest citation is dated to 1330 and comes from Guy of Warwick (MS Auchinleck).
26) observable in the prologues of the major texts (this, Spence argues, represents a shift from an earlier authorial standpoint of humility in similar situations); the representation of 'English' heroes (Havelock, Guy of Warwick, and others) whose stories are grafted on to the 'British' content in order to create a new sense of national origins; and retellings of the Norman Conquest.
Guy of Warwick loomed large in medieval lore and literature--he shares entry in Great Britain's Dictionary of National Biography with only two other legendary figures, King Arthur and Robin Hood--esteemed for both his prowess as an invincible warrior and his piety, in later years, as a pilgrim and hermit.
Robert Rouse uses Guy of Warwick as exemplary illustration of a shift in the geography of romance in "Walking (between) the Lines: Romance as Itinerary/Map," a geography seen first in Guy as an itinerary of chivalric maturation, then one of spiritual pilgrimage, but also to be seen anew as a mapping of mercantile space.
More recently we find volumes devoted to individual romances, as in the case of Bevis of Hampton (Fellows and Djordjevic 2008) and Guy of Warwick (Wiggins and Field 2007).
Andrew Jenkin has won the Hamer Award with his Autumn Gold watercolour, much more impressionistic than the majority of his work, like one of his medieval series, Sir Guy of Warwick and the Dragon of Longwitton (mixed media).
TherewereMedievalhermitshereand, legend had it, Guy of Warwick himself, the eponymous hero of the spot, once lived in a cave belowthe chapel.
Guy of Warwick, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Elizabethan Repertory
David Matthews continues the theme of Enlightenment-inspired medievalism and protonationalism with a study of legendary heroes Guy of Warwick and Bevis of Hampton in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literary circles, while articles by Helen Phillips, John Marshall, and David Mills examine gender in Chaucer's writings, Robin Hood's embodiment of pageantry, and the Chester Plays, respectively.
The book, the author tells us, is "a study of medieval writers in later print" (vii), and the writers or written works she includes are, primarily, Beowulf, Piers Plowman, Guy of Warwick and Bevis of Hampton, John Gower, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Jean Froissart.