Gwelo


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Related to Gwelo: Gweru

Gwelo

 

a city in Southern Rhodesia. Population, 41,300 (1967), including 9,300 Europeans. Railroad and highway junction. Center of a mining (chromites, asbestos, and gold) and agricultural region. Gwelo has cement and metalworking plants and produces ferrochromium.

References in periodicals archive ?
Two lay nurses and a matron from South Africa eventually took over the Gwelo hospital that the Dominicans could not take.
Regardless of the mode, the transfer was via Fort Charter, Enkeldoorn, Umvuma, Iron Mine Hill, Gwelo and thence to Bulawayo.
Dr Banda was detained in Gwelo along with Chipembere, Dunduzu, and later, Yatuta Chisiza and, for a short while, Kaphombe Nyasulu.
Before the final tragedy sets in, we meet several well-developed characters, the kind one might expect to meet in Paris: Quo Vadis Jackson, a huge black from the United States who dies brutally at the hands of a neo-fascist group; Tosca Zimsu, an attractive African woman who has been raped and whose father and husband were brutally murdered in Africa; her brilliant eleven-year-old son, Gwelo, for whose future she lives, another obsessive mother in the making; Ari, a Zulu with AIDS; and others who complete a well-rounded cast of characters.
Traditional Healers and the Shona Patient, Mambo Press: Gwelo (1978).
Gwelo Developments previous work: SOHO apartments and Mantra Pandanas,
At a party Conference in Gwelo (now Gweru) Sithole was elected president whilst Robert Mugabe was made Secretary-General.
Bishop Aloysius Haene, a Swiss missionary who arrived in Southern Rhodesia in 1940, became the first bishop of Gwelo in 1955 and established close contacts with African nationalists.
The line had been intended to run north from Gwelo, Zimbabwe to Lake Tanzania, but was diverted to exploit the Wankie coal fields, and so crossed into Zambia at Victoria Falls.
47) On his release from Gwelo gaol he added to his authority, becoming Life President of the party in 1960 and the centre of a personality cult which the Publicity Secretary, Kanyama Chiume, was particularly energetic in promulgating.
Jeater's focus, in her study if Gwelo (today known as Gweru) district, an ethnically mixed area in the Midlands of colonial Zimbabwe, is upon ~the construction of moral discourse' relating to gender and sexuality during both the pre-colonial and colonial period.
He uses names like Dovi, Gwelo (Zimbabwe), Kamuzu (Malawi), Abena (Ghana), Isanusi (South Africa) and many other African places.