Gyges


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Gyges

king’s bodyguard requested secretly to view queen undressing. [Gk. Lit.: Avery, 507–508]
References in classic literature ?
The liberty which we are supposing may be most completely given to them in the form of such a power as is said to have been possessed by Gyges the ancestor of Croesus the Lydian.
The next day must clear up every doubt; and unless his near neighbor and would-be friend, the Count of Monte Cristo, possessed the ring of Gyges, and by its power was able to render himself invisible, it was very certain he could not escape this time.
Rather than pair Wilde's Dorian Gray with Socratic eros, as has been the typical scholarly connection, Hill identifies a parallelism between Dorian Gray and Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" and "Ring of Gyges," but mostly Plato's "concern for the soul, especially the philosophical soul gone corrupt" (233).
(41) lee, e.g., FBI DIRECTORATE OF INTELLIGENCE, BITCOIN VIRTUAL CURRENCY: UNIQUE FEATURES PRESENT DISTINCT CHALLENGES FOR DETERRING ILLICIT ACTIVITY (2012) [hereinafter FBI INTELLIGENCE REPORT], https://www.wired.com/images_blogs/threatlevel/2012/05/Bitcoin-FBI.pdf; Ari Juels et al., The Ring of Gyges: Investigating the Future of Criminal Smart Contracts, 23 ACM CONF.
Intrinsic Valuing and the Limits of Justice: Why the Ring of Gyges Matters, LER PAYTAS and NICHOLAS R.
This article takes an allegorical and hermeneutical approach to interpret the tale of the Ring of Gyges, which symbolizes a feature of human behaviour that when in possession of infinite power people often become invisible, and so choose to violate norms of morality for the sake of pleasure.
19.1-3: "I don't care about the possessions of golden Gyges, / nor did jealousy lay hold of me, nor do I look with envy at the gods, / and I don't desire a great tyranny." In Martin L.
Lovecraft's works, specifically Lewis's novels Out of the Silent Planet (1938) and Perelandra (1943), and Lovecraft's stories "The White Ship" (1919), "The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath" (1927; pub.1943), "The Silver Key" (1929), and "Through the Gates of the Silver Key" (1934) can be read as interpretive commentaries on some of Plato's most famous myths, namely the Republic's allegory of the cave; the myth of the metals; the myth of Gyges; the myth of Er; and finally Diotima's concept of the ladder of knowledge (from the Symposium).
David Copp, "The Ring of Gyges: Overridingness and the Unity of Reason," in Self-Interest, ed.
Rather, we wish to draw attention, in the context of this examination, to the myth of Gyges of Lydia who, according to Plato's telling, used the magic ring that he accidentally found in the depths of a dark cave to become invisible in order to pursue his unethical, lustful nature and to take over the kingdom.
In the Republic, Plato tells the tale of the 'Ring of Gyges,' where a magical ring is found, endowing its new owner with the power of invisibility at will.