Gyges


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Gyges

king’s bodyguard requested secretly to view queen undressing. [Gk. Lit.: Avery, 507–508]
References in classic literature ?
The liberty which we are supposing may be most completely given to them in the form of such a power as is said to have been possessed by Gyges the ancestor of Croesus the Lydian.
The next day must clear up every doubt; and unless his near neighbor and would-be friend, the Count of Monte Cristo, possessed the ring of Gyges, and by its power was able to render himself invisible, it was very certain he could not escape this time.
The Lydian [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] began with a similar mixed marriage, with Gyges marrying a royal woman who was by far his social superior: there too the resulting dynasty ran a self-destructive course, and the instrument of destruction was precisely this `mule' Cyrus, `born of mixed parentage, with a mother of better class and a father of worse' (1.
Archilochus is clearly identified as the first temporally ([Characters Omitted]) and is associated with Gyges, whom he mentions in his poetry (fr.
When we first meet Gyges he is a handsome eighteen-year-old endowed with extraordinary looks and abilities who has been recalled to Lydia by a childless uncle and adopted by him.
Confronted with the suggestion that he contrived to see Candaules' wife naked, Gyges immediately expresses his horror (Herodotus 1.
It is always of barbarians; first of Gyges who cannot bear hearing Candaules' request to see what is not lawful (1.
84, where Gyges says to Candaules [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; cf.
The authority which I mean would be especially like this if the sort of power should ever be theirs that they say belonged to the ancestor of Gyges, the Lydian.
Wealth has confounded birth' [GREEK TEXT OMITTED] in the words of Theognis (190),(47) and the connection between wealth and tyranny is made most clearly by Archilochus (F 19W) 'I do not care for the wealth of the gold-laden Gyges.
In his essay "The Rings of Tolkien and Plato," Eric Katz astutely recognizes the similarities between the One Ring and Plato's Ring of Gyges and the deeper ethics that runs through the two texts.
In the Republic, Plato tells the tale of the 'Ring of Gyges,' where a magical ring is found, endowing its new owner with the power of invisibility at will.